Azo urinary pain relief

Picture this; you’re stressed because you feel a UTI coming on. You don’t know what to do because you can’t see your doctor as soon as you would like, and you’ve got places to go! A friend tells you about AZO Urinary Pain Relief® and you think to yourself, what the heck, let’s try it!

A couple of hours pass and you’re feelin’ some relief both mentally and physically ‘cause your UTI pain isn’t so bad anymore and you’re thinking, yes, I have got this under control!

On your way out the door you stop in the bathroom to pee, just really quick. Except that quick pee trip turns into a major stress trip because as you go to flush you notice your pee is ORANGE.

WHAT. IS. THIS?

Its ok, chica, no need to worry! This is just a normal side effect of AZO Urinary Pain Relief®! You still have this under control. Deep breaths…

Treatment for UTI Symptoms

AZO Urinary Pain Relief® and AZO Urinary Pain Relief® Maximum Strength don’t just treat your urinary pain like any ordinary pain. They work to relieve your UTI symptoms fast, so you don’t have to miss a thing!1 There’s just one catch—one of the key ingredients in AZO Urinary Pain Relief®, responsible for relieving your UTI symptoms so quickly, is also known to dye urine and fabrics orange.2 This key ingredient is called Phenazopyridine hydrochloride.

Phenazopyridine and UTIs

Phenazopyridine hydrochloride is the number one ingredient prescribed by doctors and recommended by pharmacists specifically for urinary discomfort.1 Phenazopyridine is a urinary analgesic, or pain reliever, that provides short-term relief of urinary tract symptoms like pain, burning and a more frequent need to go to the bathroom.3 But be careful, babes! Phenazopyridine is NOT an antibiotic and therefore cannot cure a UTI (a prescription is needed for that), it works to relieve UTI symptoms. So be sure to keep that appointment with your doc to get the proper antibiotics!2

Phenazopyridine is also known to change the color of your pee to a reddish-orange color. But like I said, don’t trip, chocolate chip! This is just a fun indication that the drug is in your system doing its job and should go away shortly after stopping use of the product!4

In the meantime, make sure you’re not chewing the AZO Urinary Pain Relief® tablets! They will definitely turn your mouth and teeth orange, and you don’t want to have to keep coming up with explanations for that!4

Tips to Remove Dye

Got that orange dye on your clothes or underwear? Don’t throw ‘em out! It’s possible to get the stains out as long as you tend to them ASAP!

To get rid of the stain, try placing the clothing on a flat surface on top of an old piece of cloth, then use a sponge or damp cloth and some laundry detergent to blot the stain until it fades.

You can also try mixing up a white vinegar and baking soda paste! Put the paste directly on the stain and let it set for about 30 minutes, then wash like normal.

Another option is to soak your clothes in a small bucket of water and bleach before washing.5

Keep calm, and carry on chicas! After all, a little orange pee is nothing compared to UTI pain, right?

US Pharm. 2012;37(6):12-15.

For years, patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs) have asked pharmacists what they can take without seeing a physician. Several products promise relief of UTI symptoms and/or claim to have an antibacterial effect that inhibits progression of the infection, but they are not proven safe and effective for any nonprescription use at present.

Patients and UTIs

UTIs are much more common among women than men.1,2 Patients may ask the pharmacist about such symptoms as frequent and intense urge to urinate, urethral or bladder burning, and pain during urination.3-5 In older patients and males, UTIs also cause fatigue, shakiness, weakness, muscle aches, and pain in the abdomen. Patients may notice cloudy, dark, or bloody urine that has an objectionable odor. If infection reaches the kidneys or prostate, fever is also common. Patients may complain of pain in the back or side (below the ribs), as well as nausea and vomiting.

Untreated UTIs

If a bacterial UTI is untreated and the causative organisms ascend the ureter without being washed out, pyelonephritis (kidney infection) is possible.5 At least 20% to 40% of women with asymptomatic bacteriuria will develop pyelonephritis.6 With appropriate treatment, the risk is reduced by 90%. This underscores the importance of pharmacists recommending physician visits in all cases.

Nonprescription UTI Products

Several widely available nonprescription products promise relief of UTI symptoms. They include single-entity phenazopyridine products (e.g., Azo Standard) and a combination product containing methenamine and sodium salicylate (e.g., Cystex).7 Pharmacists may justifiably ask whether these products are safe and effective when used by a patient with a UTI who does not plan to see a physician for a prescription antibiotic or antibacterial.

The Status of Phenazopyridine

In 1983, the FDA published a Drug Efficacy Study Implementation (DESI) notice with conditions for approval and marketing of all phenazopyridine products.7 These included sulfameth-oxazole/phenazopyridine combinations (e.g., Azo Gantanol), similar combination products, and single-entity phenazopyridine products. (Phenazopyridine had traditionally been included in sulfonamide combinations to provide relief of pain, burning, or urgency caused by a sulfonamide-susceptible organism.) The FDA presented newly required statements for all phenazopyridine products intended to relieve symptoms associated with a UTI. One of the statements was critical in determining the length of dosing: “Treatment of a urinary tract infection with phenazopyridine HCl or a combination drug product containing phenazopyridine HCl should not exceed 2 days because there is a lack of evidence that the combined administration of phenazopyridine HCl and an antibacterial provides greater benefit than administration of the anti-bacterial alone after 2 days.”7

The FDA also required the following carcinogenicity statement on all phenazopyridine labels: “Long-term administration of phenazopyridine hydrochloride has induced neoplasia in rats (large intestine) and mice (liver). Although no association between phenazopyridine hydrochloride and human neoplasia has been reported, adequate epidemiological studies along these lines have not been conducted.”7

The 1983 document did not refer specifically to safety and efficacy of OTC single-entity phenazopyridine products.7 However, in 2003 the FDA did request data on safety and efficacy of all nonprescription urinary antiseptics/analgesics.8 This document discussed phenazopyridine in depth. The first issue the agency reviewed was the strange dual marketing of the ingredient, a situation that has long puzzled pharmacists. For decades, phenazopyridine has been available as prescription single-entity 100 and 200 mg tablets (e.g., Pyridium), as well as in combinations, many of which are no longer available (e.g., Azo Gantanol, Azo Gantrisin). The core issue is why tablets containing 95 and 97.5 mg of phenazopyridine are available without prescription, when tablets containing 100 mg are prescription-only. In other words, how can the addition of a relatively minor 2.5 mg cause a product to require a prescription? The FDA attempted to explain this seemingly incongruous situation, pointing out that the ingredient’s extensive U.S. marketing history as a nonprescription ingredient predated the 1951 Durham-Humphrey Amendment to the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act that delineated which conditions would require prescription status. On the basis of this marketing history alone, phenazopyridine was allowed to retain nonprescription status, a situation that continues to this day.

The best known phenazopyridine nonprescription product is Azo Standard.9 Azo Standard contains 95 mg of phenazopyridine per tablet and Azo Standard Maximum Strength contains 97.5 mg of phenazopyridine.10 The dosage of both is 2 tablets 3 times daily with or after meals as needed.

The FDA conducted an examination of nonprescription phenazopyridine products prior to publication of the 2003 call for data, reporting that one manufacturer did not place the required 1983 carcinogenesis warning on the outer package, but placed it on an insert included in the package.8 In that case, a purchaser could not be warned until after the product was bought and the tamper-proof packaging destroyed. Should the purchaser subsequently decide against using the product, his or her ability to return it for a refund would be impaired.

The FDA addressed several questions to manufacturers regarding the safety and efficacy of phenazopyridine in its 2003 call for data8:

1. Is this condition (i.e., a UTI) appropriate for self-medication?

2. If the answer to the first question is yes, should the product labeling mention the possible need for treatment with an antibacterial drug also?

3. Is there a valid basis for having single-ingredient prescription products with a 200 mg dosage and OTC products with a 190- to 195-mg dosage? What data support these dosages? (Note that this statement refers to the manufacturer-recommended dosages of 2 tablets of Azo Standard, containing 95 mg per tablet, and 2 tablets of Azo Standard Maximum Strength, containing 97.5 mg per tablet).

4-7. These items dealt with potential carcinogenicity. The FDA asked whether any epidemiological studies since 1978 had addressed the issue, whether the neoplasia findings were of sufficient concern to restrict phenazopyridine to prescription status, and whether the carcinogenicity label should be required to appear on the outer packaging.

8. Provide updated safety data both from the literature and from adverse event reports for the last 20 years.8

Manufacturers Respond to the FDA

The FDA received at least three responses to its list of phenazopyridine questions within a 6-month period. The Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) asked the FDA to review phenazopyridine, but completely sidestepped the issue of carcinogenicity.11 A submission from Polymedica Pharmaceuticals (distributor of Azo Standard) asserted that urinary discomfort should be self-treatable, and further argued against warning patients on product labels that they may need a concomitant antibacterial.12 Polymedica also claimed that phenazopyridine dosages of 190 to 195 mg are safe and effective, but did not submit clinical dosage studies to support its assertions. Polymedica argued against including any carcinogenesis statement. In short, the submission was entirely laudatory about phenazopyridine, although it did not report newly conducted clinical studies, as would have been required by the FDA to establish safety and efficacy.

A brief submission from Johnson & Johnson (marketers of the now-discontinued Uristat, a nonprescription phenazopyridine product) made essentially the same arguments as Polymedica, denying the need for carcinogenicity labeling.13 This submission also failed to include new clinical studies providing evidence of safety and efficacy.

The Status of Methenamine Combination Products

The FDA’s 2003 request for data and information also targeted a combination product containing methenamine, sodium salicylate, salicylamide, and benzoic acid.8 The FDA mentioned that the manufacturer would be required to make a new submission, as the old one from the 1970s was badly outdated. The product most closely resembling this combination at present is Cystex.9 Each tablet contains 162 mg of methenamine and 162.5 mg of sodium salicylate, with benzoic acid listed as an inactive ingredient. The dosage is 2 tablets with a full glass of water 4 times daily.14 None of these ingredients as dosed in the nonprescription product is proven to be safe and effective at preventing or treating UTIs at the present time.

Potential Misuse of Nonprescription UTI Products

The danger of carcinogenicity with phenazopyridine apparently remains open. However, the FDA and the manufacturers overlooked a far more likely scenario that could cause patient harm. If a woman has a UTI, she should make an appointment with a physician to receive the appropriate antibacterial/antimicrobial prescription. If she unwisely chooses to take an OTC product as her sole treatment, she may experience relief of discomfort and assume that she does not need to see a doctor. By doing so, she avoids the trouble of providing a urine specimen and saves the associated costs of a physician office visit (e.g., income loss from taking time off from work). Should she fail to obtain a prescription, her UTI may continue, worsening as the days pass without effective treatment.

Manufacturers responsibly urge purchasers on product labels to obtain a diagnosis and use the product only for relief while they are waiting to see their physicians or for the prescription to begin to work. The labels also warn against use for more than 2 days. Despite the presence of these warnings, research conducted by the National Council on Patient Information and Education confirmed that purchasers often disregard package labels.9 In this case, disregarding the label could lead to permanent kidney damage.6 Thus, the advice and assistance of the pharmacist is crucial when consumers request these products.

PATIENT INFORMATION

Types of UTIs

Many people refer to a urinary tract infection (UTI) as a bladder or kidney infection, but it is more complicated than that. If the infection occurs in the urine passage (urethra), it is known as urethritis. If it reaches the bladder, it is called cystitis. If the UTI moves to the kidney, it is known as pyelonephritis.

Are UTIs Serious?

Most UTIs are not serious if they are treated rapidly and appropriately. But some can lead to dangerous problems, such as kidney infections. You may lessen the risk of this by promptly seeing a physician, getting your antibiotic/antimicrobial prescription filled, and taking the medication exactly as directed to kill the organisms. If you fail to do so, a kidney infection can occur and become chronic. Chronic kidney infections can lead to permanent damage, such as scarring of the kidneys, reduced kidney function, hypertension, and other issues.

Nonprescription Products for UTIs

When you have a UTI, it is vital to make a doctor’s appointment. You should never try to treat it on your own with home remedies or nonprescription products. Some women purchase OTC products without medical advice, such as those containing phenazopyridine (e.g., Azo Standard). Purchasers may believe that this ingredient alone can cure the UTI. This is a common misconception, as the product may provide only temporary relief of symptoms (e.g., burning, pain, urgency, frequency).

After obtaining this relief, a woman may decide that the UTI is gone and that she does not need to see her physician after all. This is a mistake. Phenazopyridine does not act to kill bacteria, so any relief obtained is probably short-lived. The label warns against using the product for more than 2 days, and advises seeing a physician if symptoms last more than 2 days. Of course, the safest course of action is to see a physician first, and ask whether this product should be used along with the antibiotic/antibacterial prescription product. Further, no herbal product or dietary supplement is proven safe or effective for preventing or treating a UTI.

Home Remedies

Some women attempt to prevent UTIs by drinking cranberry juice. Cranberry juice is not proven medically to prevent UTIs. Neither are cranberry tablets
(e.g., Azo Cranberry). A more dangerous practice is to rely on cranberry juice to treat a UTI. Cranberry juice has no proven antibiotic/antibacterial activity that would eradicate an existing UTI. As described above, a physician visit is mandatory.

Preventing UTIs

There are some commonsense steps you can take to prevent UTIs. Drink plenty of water every day. Urinate whenever you feel the slightest urge and never try to hold it in. Urinate right after sexual intercourse, as organisms can move from the bowel or vagina to the urethral opening. If you have recurrent UTIs, switch to a different method of birth control. Condoms, spermicides, and diaphragms may be more conducive to the development of UTIs.

Remember, if you have questions, Consult Your Pharmacist.

To comment on this article, contact [email protected]

WHAT CAUSES UTIS (URINARY TRACT INFECTION)?

Bacteria entering the urinary tract system and attaching to the bladder wall typically cause urinary tract infections. The most common bacteria to cause a UTI is E.coli.1

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF A UTI?

The most common UTI symptoms are:

  • Pain or painful urination
  • Frequent need to urinate
  • Burning sensation while urinating
  • Bladder spasm
  • Lower back pain
  • Fever

If you experience any of these symptoms, immediately consult your physician. Learn more about common UTI symptoms and about diagnosing a UTI

WILL AZO URINARY PAIN RELIEF CURE MY UTI?

No. The only clinically proven cure for a UTI is a prescription antibiotic. AZO Urinary Pain Relief will only provide fast temporary UTI relief from pain, burning and urgency.

HOW LONG CAN I TAKE AZO URINARY PAIN RELIEF?

The recommended dosage is two (2) tablets three times a day. Do not use for more than 2 days (12 tablets) without consulting a healthcare professional.

CAN I TAKE AZO URINARY PAIN RELIEF FOR MORE THAN TWO DAYS?

Please consult your healthcare professional before taking AZO Urinary Pain Relief for more than two days.

CAN MEN TAKE AZO URINARY PAIN RELIEF?

Yes. AZO Urinary Pain Relief will effectively provide relief from UTI symptoms in both men and women.

CAN I TAKE AZO URINARY PAIN RELIEF IF I AM PREGNANT OR BREASTFEEDING?

Please consult your healthcare professional before taking, especially if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. It is recommended to take a pregnancy test and consult with a healthcare professional prior to taking the product.

HOW LONG DOES AZO URINARY PAIN RELIEF REMAIN IN THE BODY?

AZO Urinary Pain Relief reaches the bladder within one hour as indicated by a change in urine color and may stay in your system for up to 24 hours.

WILL AZO URINARY PAIN RELIEF INTERFERE WITH DRUG TESTS?

AZO Urinary Pain Relief may interfere with the reading of any colorimetric urine analysis (such as AZO Test Strips), as the active ingredient, an organic dye, will color the test pads and may make them difficult to read. If you are concerned about potential test interference, please contact your healthcare professional.

CAN I TAKE ONLY HALF OF AN AZO URINARY PAIN RELIEF TABLET?

No, the tablets are intended to be taken whole. Cutting the tablet will break the thin protective coating and may cause staining on the skin and any other surface they come in contact with.

CAN I CHEW THE AZO URINARY PAIN RELIEF TABLETS?

No, chewing the tablets will cause the teeth and mouth to become stained. The tablets are intended to be taken whole, and should not be cut, chewed or crushed.

WILL AZO URINARY PAIN RELIEF STAIN MY SKIN?

Care must be taken when handling AZO Urinary Pain Relief as any objects that come in contact with them may become stained.

HOW CAN AZO URINARY PAIN RELIEF STAIN MY CONTACT LENSES?

Care must be taken when handling AZO Urinary Pain Relief products. If the tablets are handled in such a way as to transfer its contents onto your skin, then there is the possibility of transferring the medicine from your fingers to your contact lenses. Care must be taken when handling AZO Urinary Pain Relief as any objects that come in contact with the tablets may get stained.

WHAT KIND OF FOOD ALLERGIES DO THE AZO URINARY PAIN RELIEF PACKAGES REFER TO?

Phenazopyridine hydrochloride is an organic dye. If you are sensitive to dyes in foods then you may be sensitive to AZO Urinary Pain Relief. We recommend you consult your healthcare professional before taking, especially when concerned about potential allergies.

CAN I GIVE AZO URINARY PAIN RELIEF TO A CHILD?

AZO Urinary Pain Relief is not recommended for children under the age of 12, unless specifically instructed by a healthcare professional.

WILL AZO URINARY PAIN RELIEF CHANGE THE COLOR OF MY URINE?

Yes. This is normal as the active ingredient is an organic dye.

i-Health, Inc. RETURN POLICY

If you are not satisfied with the product you purchased, we recommend that you ask the authorized retailer that sold it to you to refund your money. If the authorized retailer will not accept the product, you may return it directly to us.

If you would like to return an i-Health, Inc. product for a refund, please follow the instructions below.

To process a refund request, please send:

  • Your store receipt from an authorized retailer, clearly indicating the store where the item was purchased and circle the item and purchase price of the product being returned.
  • The box and unused portion of the product being returned.
  • A note briefly explaining why you are returning the item for a refund or exchange, and also include your name, mailing address, and telephone number.

Please send all of the materials above to:

i-Health, Inc.
Attn: Consumer Resources
55 Sebethe Dr.
Suite 102
Cromwell, CT 06416

PLEASE BE ADVISED:

  • If you do not have all of the information and documentation requested above, we will not be able to provide a refund.
  • Refunds are only for the value of the product. Shipping expenses and taxes will not be reimbursed.
  • We recommend shipping via certified mail, UPS, or some other service that will confirm delivery of your items.
  • i-Health, Inc. will not accept expired product.
  • Items must be returned/exchanged within 90 days of purchase.
  • Maximum return limit of 2 items of the same brand.
  • Please allow 6-8 weeks for your return to be processed.

AZO Urinary Pain Relief, Maximum Strength

UTI pain is not like ordinary pain. It’s not a headache after a long stressful day or sore muscles after exercise. It’s an unbearable, burning, intense pain that can ruin more than your mood. As you wait for your doctor’s appointment, take AZO Urinary Pain Relief Maximum Strength at the first sign of UTI pain, and feel better fast! 12 tablets per box.

  • Contains more of the active ingredient per tablet to provide fast, maximum strength relief of urinary pain, burning and urgency.
  • Proven to go directly to the site of discomfort and provides relief in as little as 20 minutes — right where it hurts, unlike general pain relievers.

Active Ingredients: Phenazopyridine Hydrochloride (the #1 ingredient prescribed by doctors and recommended by pharmacists specifically for urinary discomfort, something that general pain relievers with acetaminophen or ibuprofen do not contain.)

Inactive ingredients: Microcrystalline cellulose, pregelatinized cornstarch, hypromellose, povidone croscarmellose sodium, polyethylene glycol, carnauba wax and vegetable magnesium stearate. May also contain cornstarch.

Warnings:

  • Ask a doctor before use if you have; kidney disease, allergies to foods/preservatives/dyes, hypersensitive reactive to Phenazopyridine Hydrochloride, Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency or sensitivities to lactose.
  • If pregnant or breastfeeding, ask a heath profession before use.
  • Stop use and ask doctor if symptoms last for more than 2 days or if you suspect you are having an adverse reaction to the medication.

Other Information: This product can interfere with laboratory tests including urine, glucose (sugar), and ketone tests. This product may stain soft contact lenses and other items if handled after touching tablets.

AZO Urinary Tract Health

Generic Name: phenazopyridine hydrochloride
Dosage Form: tablet

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Jan 1, 2019.

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Disclaimer: This drug has not been found by FDA to be safe and effective, and this labeling has not been approved by FDA.

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Active Ingredient (in each tablet)

Phenazopyridine Hydrochloride 95 mg

Purpose

Urinary tract analgesic

Use Relief from urinary pain, burning, urgency and frequency associated with urinary tract infections.

Warnings

Please read insert for important precautions.

Ask a doctor before use if you have

  • kidney disease
  • allergies to foods, preservatives or dyes
  • had a hypersensitive reaction to Phenazopyridine Hydrochloride
  • Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency
  • sensitivities to lactose

When using this product

  • stomach upset may occur, taking this product with or after meals may reduce stomach upset.
  • your urine will become reddish-orange in color. This is not harmful, but care should be taken to avoid staining clothing or other items.

Stop use and ask doctor if

  • your symptoms last for more than 2 days
  • you suspect you are having an adverse reaction to the medication.

If pregnant or breastfeeding, ask a health professional before use. A pregnancy test and consultation with a health professional if pregnancy is confirmed is recommended prior to use.

Keep out of reach of children. In case of an overdose, get medical help or contact a Poison Control Center right away.

Directions

  • Adults and children 12 years and older: Take 2 tablets 3 times daily with or after meals as needed for up to two days. Take with a full glass of water. Do not use for more than 2 days (12 tablets) without consulting a doctor.
  • Children under 12: Do not use without consulting a doctor.

Other Information

  • This product can interfere with laboratory tests including urine, glucose (sugar), and ketones tests
  • This product may stain soft contact lenses and other items if handled after touching tablets
  • Store at room temperature (59-86 degrees F) in a dry place and protect from light.

Tamper evident: Product is dealed within blisters. Do not use if any part of the blister is torn, open or damaged.

Inactive ingredients Lactose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, pharmaceutical glaze, sodium starch glycolate and talc.

2 Solutions for Urinary Tract Health*

AZO

Urinary Tract Health

SUPPORT PACK

Urinary Pain Relief

  • RELIEVES PAIN, BURNING AND URGENCY
  • TARGETS THE SOURCE OF PAIN

MOST TRUSED #1 BRAND

18 Tablets

95 mg Phenazopyridine Hydrochloride

Cranberry

  • HELPS FLUSH TO MAINTAIN URINARY TRACT CLEANLINESS*
  • WITH PROBIOTIC

14 Caplets

Dietary Supplement

*THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FDA. THIS IF NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.

AZO Urinary Tract Health
phenazopyridine hydrochloride tablet
Product Information
Product Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG LABEL Item Code (Source) NDC:49973-760
Route of Administration ORAL DEA Schedule
Active Ingredient/Active Moiety
Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength
PHENAZOPYRIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE (PHENAZOPYRIDINE) PHENAZOPYRIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE 95 mg
Inactive Ingredients
Ingredient Name Strength
LACTOSE
MAGNESIUM STEARATE
CELLULOSE, MICROCRYSTALLINE
SHELLAC
SODIUM STARCH GLYCOLATE TYPE A CORN
TALC
Product Characteristics
Color brown (Maroon) Score no score
Shape ROUND (Tablet) Size 7mm
Flavor Imprint Code W
Contains
Packaging
# Item Code Package Description
1 NDC:49973-760-32 9 BLISTER PACK in 1 BOX
1 2 TABLET in 1 BLISTER PACK
2 NDC:49973-760-30 15 BLISTER PACK in 1 PACKAGE
2 2 TABLET in 1 BLISTER PACK
3 NDC:49973-760-24 12 BLISTER PACK in 1 PACKAGE
3 2 TABLET in 1 BLISTER PACK
4 NDC:49973-760-12 6 BLISTER PACK in 1 PACKAGE
4 2 TABLET in 1 BLISTER PACK
Marketing Information
Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
unapproved drug other 02/28/2014

Labeler – i-Health, Inc. (061427694)

Establishment
Name Address ID/FEI Operations
Contract Pharmacal Corporation 057795122 manufacture(49973-760)

i-Health, Inc.

Related questions

  • Why do you not take phenazopyridine for more than two days?

Medical Disclaimer

More about phenazopyridine

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  • Drug class: miscellaneous genitourinary tract agents

Consumer resources

  • Phenazopyridine
  • Phenazopyridine (Advanced Reading)

Professional resources

  • Phenazopyridine Hydrochloride (AHFS Monograph)
  • Phenazopyridine (Wolters Kluwer)
  • Phenazopyridine Tablets (FDA)

Other brands: Pyridium, Azo-Gesic

Related treatment guides

  • Interstitial Cystitis
  • Dysuria

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