App that tells you how good looking you are

Tired of the careful, couched feedback you’ve been getting around how beautiful people think you are? Want the real honest truth about where you fall on the 1-10 scale? Download Spontana, the newest disturbing scar on the arc of modern narcissism. Blatantly branded in the same chunky cursive as Instagram, Spontana enables you to upload selfies to a band of altruistic strangers who will tell you how good looking they think you are. Say goodbye to reading into your Like/Comment statistics on IG and say hello to your official, totally objective beauty grade.

“The role of Spontana is to satisfy your desire of getting feedback on what different people think about your current look,” says the , literally answering our prayers.

It’s important to satisfy this particular desire, which stems from the patriarchal paradigm that did us the favor of defining feminine beauty and then demanding we all value it, invest in it and worship it. I’m grateful someone found a way to capitalize on this particular gap in the market and am excited to come to terms with what other Spontana users think of my nose.

If you, too, are eager to double down on how much you care about what people think of your face, I recommend you climb aboard. For a sneak peek into what it’s actually like, read about tech writer Daniel Cooper’s experience with the app here.

“f the subject comes up in conversation, I’ll joke that, on a hypothetical scale, I’m a ‘four … in bad light,’” says Cooper, a light-hearted man who is able to find the humor in the 1 to 10 scale. “The internet, however, has enabled me to find out precisely how other people rate my attractiveness. It’s been a fun week.”

(It could be a fun week for you, too!)

Sorry to spoil the surprise, but Cooper is a 59.8/100. While he initially describes himself as “gripped by the buzz” incited by the app, he goes on to admit it’s all, “incredibly messed up when you think about it.” Eventually Cooper goes on to rate others, at which point he employs the charitable approach of “gently inflating” scores for those he finds less attractive to “cushion the blow.”

I’m sure Cooper is just one of many humanitarians you can expect to find on Spontana, the app that helps us discover how a smattering of Internet people feel about our chins. Tired of not feeling objectified enough? Relief is on the way!

Illustration by GraphicaArtis via Getty Images; collage by Maria Jia Ling Pitt.

There seems to be an app for everything these days – even to see how you would fare in a beauty contest.

Although named the opposite, Ugly Meter iPhone app does just that – take a picture of your’s, scan it and grade your beauty in terms of ugliness. Few tag lines of the app reads “Met someone new? Scan their face to know how ugly they are” and “When your friends won’t tell you the truth, the ugly meter will.”

The app rates each face with a score of 0-10. Zero being the most beautiful of all and 10 the ugliest. Those daring enough to find out the judgment are not only rewarded with a score, but also with a smart comment that makes the score more meaningful. For instance the ugly meter says Angelina Jolie is “so hot she would make the sun jealous”.

Now wait a minute. Before hurrying to try it out on your own face, be prepared for some insult as well. Here’s another result that might shock you a bit.

And the results may not always be what you would expect from Snow White’s truth-telling mirror. Here’s how the it scaled some of the celebrities –

  • Brad Pitt got rated 8/10.
  • David Cameron, the British prime minister got 7/10.
  • Cheryl Cole averaged 4.2/10.
  • Angelina Jolie got a 2/10 making her a real pretty face.

Interestingly, more and more people are keen to explore this beauty app. According to the dailymail, the app has already raked in $500,000 based on its $0.99 and $4.99(pro) paid versions. The app developers also said they made $80,000 in a single day after it was mentioned in the Howard Stern radio show in the US.

Most youngsters find the app fun and entertaining. Model Carun Carumbiah says

Sometimes you have to give yourself a reality check. An app like this could motivate you to look better.

But along with Carun, there are those who are not too desirous on this kind of beauty judgment by a mere piece of technology. Model Apoorva says –

I don’t need an app to tell me how I look. I would rather have real people tell me the truth.

Regardless of all opinions, any one with an iPhone seems to be keen on getting an answer to the fundamental human curiosity – “How attractive am I”. The app is sitting No.25 in China’s app store and is No.25 in the US… but isn’t even in the top 200 in UK. Did the prime minister’s score scare the Brits or the news hasn’t spread enough? Need to wait and see.

There’s so much buzz around Augmented Reality experiences these days that one often forgets to talk about the amazing related technologies such as Image Recognition. To illustrate that it is far from being a futuristic, geeky niche, the industry is already worth $11.7bn.

We will show you how you can use this exciting tech to turn an unexpected asset into your marketing superweapon: your product packaging.

What is Image Recognition and what can you do with it?

In case you are not completely familiar with the term, Image Recognition tech enables apps and websites to identify pictures and photos, logos and artwork, various objects (including product packages and labels), landmarks etc. Upon successful identification, the technology can trigger digital experiences (such as a game, a video or Augmented Reality content, even offline) or lead the user to an online site or hyperlinked content.

Implementing this technology (such as our Image Recognition solution) on mobile platforms enable companies to create all sorts of engaging customer experiences that are accessible to all users. (Read: they don’t need expensive headsets, they can just use their regular tablets or smartphones.)

Even if Image Recognition is the ‘chameleon’ of mobile technologies as it seamlessly fits into a wide range of use cases, now let’s focus on a specific, $24 trillion industry: retail & product discovery.

Death to boring retail experiences

Not so long ago, whenever the girl in that photo (and her real-life counterparts) saw something they liked at a store, on the street or at a friend’s house, they had to go online, open one of the behemoth search engines in the browser and start typing in the product’s name. (Or, what’s worse, fabricating vague descriptions that return thousands of results, half of which are completely irrelevant.)

Now, the girl might just pull her phone out of her pocket (if she hasn’t already had it in her hand, as 40% of young customers love to use their mobile devices in stores and consider them their ultimate shopping companion).

She opens the retailer’s or brand’s app, points her phone’s camera at the package of the product and voilà: she can match prices, see peer reviews, watch inspiring videos, share it on social, set up a sale alert, or directly purchase it with one tap.

This is what we call ‘Scan-to-Shop’ experiences.

Watch our demo video recorded at the Millennial 20/20 event in London to get the idea in 30 seconds.

You may think: this looks like fun. But does it really matter to customers?

Actually, it does. And how!

This is why Scan-to-Shop matters to your customers:

Some supporting facts about today’s customers:

1. They want instant gratification.

Their attention span is limited to just a few seconds. If they see a product they like, they may want to be able to know more about it right now (especially if it needs more consideration because of its high value) or even get it right away.

Now, Scan-to-Shop lets them do that: you scan a product with your device and it links to the mCommerce site or convincing demonstrations.

2. They expect personalized experiences.

They want to be recognized by their favorite brands (both literally and figuratively speaking) so that they only see offers that are personally relevant to them.

Scan-to-Shop lets you scan a product and get an interactive, ever-changing, personalized digital store experience that is tailored to what you’re looking for.

3. They despise boring, outdated marketing tactics.

Only 1% of Millennials surveyed said that a compelling advertisement would make them trust a brand more. They care much more about authentic experiences they can share on social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram or Snapchat.

Image Recognition technology allows your customers to interact with your product packaging and print materials. In other words, something that is otherwise 100% offline and passive gets connected to 100% digital experiences that are timely, interactive, personalized and unexpected. Most importantly, anything but boring.

Imagine ‘Scan-to-Shop’ mobile experiences like these…

Spotted a gorgeous but pricey makeup kit? Open a beauty retailer’s branded app and point your smartphone at the eyeshadow palette. The app identifies the scanned product, shows you makeup tutorials and matches the best price available.

Use your phone to scan the label of a bottle of divine Cabernet Sauvignon you grabbed to get matching recipes for your dinner date at home. Or to buy a bottle of the wine you liked at a restaurant, using an app like Uvinum.

Point your smartphone’s camera at a print ad, magazine or an outdoor poster featuring an outfit you like. Connect to the brand’s online store and buy the products with one tap. See how Glamour did it.

How to turn your product packaging into an online store in 3 easy steps:

If you think that the experiences outlined above require several months of complicated development on the clients’ side, including a high dose of blood, sweat, and tears, then you are wrong.

Luckily, we provide all kinds of tools for your developers (such as native SDKs, API, and a web-based content management system) that make it super-fast and easy to integrate our Image Recognition tech into your own branded apps and websites.

Take a quick look to see how it goes:

Why would you settle for 20th-century marketing for the customers of our mobile-first age? Schedule a demo with us if you want to learn more and make your products come alive.

How Hot are You?

Let Artificial Intelligence decide if you are Hot or Not

Often people wonder, ” how attractive am I ?” or “ am I hot ?” or ” am I hot or not ?”
We have all asked ourselves these questions, however until Hotness.ai, a person had limited options in determining how attractive they were. Typically, the only options available were simple facial attractiveness tests that used either no facial recognition software or appeared to respond with random scores. While these facial attractiveness tests were largely for entertainment purposes, the overall experience left people wanting something more accurate.

Hotness.ai offers anybody the ability to have their photo scanned by facial recognition software and compared against a database of other photos.You just have to choose the photo of yourself that you wish to upload to the Facial Attractiveness Test , which will then scan the photo to determine the person’s facial features based on a number of different facial points. A facial attractiveness score between 1 and 10 is then displayed under the person’s photo.

Facial Features Recognition

The facial recognition api developed by Haystack.ai determines the person’s facial features by mapping their face. The shape and size of the eyes, nose, cheekbones, mouth and jaw are some of the important features used in determining a person’s unique facial structure. The facial recognition software also determines a person’s age based on a variety of features.

There are important factors in regards to facial attractiveness that determine how a facial attractiveness score is calculated once a person’s facial points have been determined. For a person’s eyes, the distance between the eyes and the depth of the eye sockets are important factors. Important factors for a person’s nose, the width of the nose and the length of the nose. Other important factors include the size of a person’s lips, the length, and width of their chin and jaw and the position of their cheeks.

Deep Learning

Deep learning offers a variety of benefits to artificial intelligence algorithms . Essentially, it is the process of continually feeding new information into an artificial intelligence system and increasing the amount of information in the databases used for many purposes, including mapping the history of and guiding the predictions of an artificial intelligence system. For facial recognition systems, this new information is used to evolve the artificial intelligence algorithms that help determine accurate facial points. In the case of the Hotness.ai Facial Attractiveness Test, this new information also helps determine a more accurate facial attractiveness score.

New data is constantly fed into deep learning, which uses existing and new data to identify facial features better and more accurately determine a facial attractiveness score, is an important part in the development of better accuracy and scoring.

Deep learning is used to continually increase the accuracy of the facial recognition process by comparing new photos of a person’s face with a continually growing database of photos previously evaluated for facial attractiveness. Deep learning also is used to improve the Hotness.ai Facial Attractiveness Test scores by comparing previous facial features and their facial attractiveness scores with new photos to form a scoring curve of more and more accurate facial attractiveness scores.

How Old Are You?

Let Artificial Intelligence tell how old are you ,try out our other app which will tell you, how old you look.

Ethnicity & Diversity Recognition

Let Artificial Intelligence tell your ethincity by doing diversity recognition ,try out this other app which will tell your ethinicty. It’s based on Haystack Ethnicity Recognition API.

Mobile App

The Hotness.ai mobile app offers a person the ability to upload their photos from their mobile phones and tablets to have their facial attractiveness calculated and scored. The Hotness.ai mobile app also provides users the ability to anonymously rate other users’ facial attractiveness, using the same scoring system of 1 to 10. These user scores are then fed into deep learning to help the facial recognition api determine the attractiveness curve based on current trends in the way real people view the facial attractiveness of others.

These facial features and facial attractiveness scores are calculated together and compared against a database of other facial features and facial attractiveness scores to determine a current facial attractiveness score. The result is a more accurate facial attractiveness score between 1 and 10, with 1 being low facial attractiveness and 10 being high facial attractiveness, based on the previous and current facial features and facial attractiveness scores.

How Attractive Are You? What You Need to Know About Attractiveness

How attractive am I to others?

Am I attractive at all?

In some ways, it seems like society is putting more focus than ever on visual appeal for both men and women. We use dating apps to quickly assess whether we find someone cute, and if we don’t, we can just swipe left and remove them from our lives. And it’s definitely worse for you women: you have magazines trying to sell you all kinds of products to “fix” whatever is wrong with you. When, in fact, nothing at all is the matter with you!

But still, I understand. You may wonder how attractive you are, and that’s completely natural. If you recently got out of a relationship or were divorced, your confidence may be shaken, and you may want some security in knowing you can still attract the opposite sex.

I totally get it.

Attractiveness is like the Holy Grail for many people, particularly if they’re single. I want to tackle this huge subject for you by giving you some fantastic data and insights.

In this post, I want to dive into the topic of beauty and attraction, make you really examine how you see yourself, and then help you consider how others see you. I’m going to tell you about a couple of fascinating studies on this topic of attractiveness too, so stay tuned!

First: How Do You See Yourself? How Attractive Am I?

How attractive are you? How do you see yourself?

They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and before you start wondering what others think of you, I want you to be that beholder for a minute.

How do you see yourself? Do you think you’re attractive?

The problem for most of us is that we’re too close to our own physical appearance. We track every wrinkle, every zit. We know when we’re having a bad hair day. Being in a bad mood can impact how we feel about our looks, and having self-esteem can make us feel positive about our attractiveness.

It’s hard to be objective when it comes to assessing your own looks.

If, when you ask yourself, am I attractive, you don’t have an answer, consider what you find attractive in other people.

Is it a perfect face? Probably not. Is it a genuine smile? Maybe laugh lines? Dark eyes? Is it more of an individual’s personality or confidence that makes them attractive to you? Knowing what appeals to you in others can help you determine how you see yourself physically.

I know it’s easy to criticize our own looks.

Ug. That zit covers my entire nose. I’m hideous!

These gray hairs make me feel so old!

I don’t fit in any of my cute clothes anymore.

You’re far from alone. In a thread on Reddit, participants commented on the question “How attractive am I and why?”

The majority were pretty harsh on themselves. I have trouble believing there are that many ugly people in the world.

I want you to realize that beauty isn’t just skin deep. It goes into your soul, into who you are. If you genuinely feel like a sexy, confident lady, then by golly, you are. No one’s opinion of you or your attractiveness matters nearly as much as your own opinion does.

How Do Others See You? Do You Know How Attractive You Are?

Dating apps don’t rate attractiveness the right way.

You searched for “how attractive am I to others,” so I’m going to go out on a limb here and assume that you’re not completely sure how others see you.

Maybe you’re basing your self-worth on how few guys you’ve met on dating apps, where, as I said, you’re pretty much judged superficially, at least at the start. Or maybe you don’t get responses to the messages you send to guys, and now you’re criticizing yourself, thinking it’s your looks that didn’t spark his interest.

So if you’re basing how you think others see you on your dating app results, here’s why you shouldn’t.

1. Your Profile Pics Tell a Limited Story

Even if you took the time to pick out the photos and selfies of you that made you look as awesome as possible, those photos are only two-dimensional, so they only show what you look like in one pose. Because you’re smiling for the camera, that might not be what you look like when you’re smiling out of happiness. We tend to look different for the camera.

2. Everyone’s Looking for Something Different

You might have gone all out with the makeup in your dating pics, but did you know that 86% of men prefer women with light and natural makeup? So while you might think you’re making yourself more attractive by piling on the makeup, you might, in fact, be turning more men away than you knew.

But beyond makeup, there are men who are into voluptuous women. Men who like skinny ladies. Guys who like big lips. Big hips. Big eyes. You can’t please everyone, nor do you want to. But know that there is a segment of the population who’s into exactly what you have to offer.

3. In-Person, Attraction is Different

Because your dating profile pics capture you frozen in time, you may look completely different to someone when you meet them in person. Maybe your mouth is crooked when you talk, or you raise your eyebrows a lot. These are things that don’t show up in photos. And then there’s the whole chemistry thing. You can’t know that you have chemistry with someone just by looking at their photo. But when you meet them in person, you’ll know if you’re physically attracted to them.

And hey, if you don’t want to go on dead-end dates, check out the up-and-coming dating app Pheramor. This dating app takes a DNA sample from you, combines it with your social media activity, and matches you with men who you’re guaranteed to have sexual chemistry with!

I ramble on about dating apps because they’re a good example of why you shouldn’t assume you know how others see you, or use them as a metric for how attractive you are.

You could argue that everyone in the world is attractive…to someone. The guy who smiled at you with missing teeth in the checkout line may not be your cup of tea, but somewhere out there is a woman who would find him adorable.

Do We Usually See Ourselves as Others See Us?

How he sees you probably isn’t how you see yourself.

There’s almost always a disconnect between how attractive we find ourselves and how attractive we think others find us. Nearly always, we think we are less attractive than others do.

It goes back to what I said earlier in this article: you scrutinize how attractive you are and every single flaw you think you have far more than anyone else does. You may have spent 20 minutes bemoaning how your hair wouldn’t lay flat, but then you walked to Starbucks and some guy totally checked you out. He didn’t have the information about your hair struggle, and even if he did, he wouldn’t have changed his mind about finding you attractive.

And if you’re in a long-term relationship, you might think your fella loves you in spite of your flaws, but allow me to speak for him just a moment:

He actually loves you because of those (perceived) flaws.

Men are totally into your dimple, your stretch marks, and your curved belly. I’m not making this up! Ask your man what he thinks of whatever you think is so terrible about your body, and I guarantee he will have a different perspective than you. What a guy.

Scientists have studied what’s referred to as meta-accuracy, or how well what you think of yourself matches with what others think of you. In nearly all of the studies, what individuals thought of themselves in terms of attractiveness or personality didn’t align with how their friends and family saw them.

What Psychological Distance Does for How We View Ourselves

Nicholas Epley, a behavioral scientist at the University of Chicago, and Tal Eyal, a psychologist at Israel’s Ben-Gurion University, have conducted several studies to assess the correlation between how people view their own attractiveness and how others do. All the studies showed a discrepancy between the two views, showing that the subjects being rated for attractiveness were usually harder when rating their own attractiveness.

In one study, students were photographed and told that other students would be rating them for attractiveness. Some participants were told that they would be rated the same day, while others were told they would be rated in a few months. The students were then asked to predict how attractive they anticipated other people would find their photo.

The ones who were told they would be rated in months were more accurate in assessing how others would rate them than those who were told they would be rated the same day.

Why?

There was more psychological distance between the time participants were photographed and when people would rate them, and so those who would be rated later were able to better see themselves through the eyes of someone else.

If you were one of those students and you were having a bad day, you’d probably predict that someone assessing your attractiveness that same day would score you low. On the other hand, if someone was going to rate you in a few months, that bad day seems less important, so you might predict they’d score you higher.

Make sense?

The Role of Chemistry in Attraction

Chemistry plays a large role in attraction.

When you ask how attractive am I, what you’re probably asking is how attractive am I to this particular person?

Because really: do you care how attractive you are to the entire world, or do you want one specific person to go gaga for you? Whether you’re in a relationship or looking for one, you want that one person to be drawn to you like a moth to a flame.

Attraction and attractiveness are based significantly on chemistry. You might find someone mildly attractive in a photo, but in person, MAN! Is he hot!

What happens to make such different responses?

It might be how you smell, for starters.

You’ve heard of pheromones, right? They’re the chemicals we release from our bodies that can alter the behavior of others. There have been ample studies on animals and insects, which have proven that pheromones are involved in sexual attraction for them, and there are some assumptions that the same applies to humans.

Voice and scent, too, play a role in attraction. Science backs this up. So before you spend three hours in the bathroom getting ready for a first date, gargle some salt water to make sure your voice is clear and sexy, and use your favorite body wash, because he might be more attracted to you through those things than your physical looks!

Just don’t assume that a photo alone is enough to know if someone finds you attractive. All the more reason to go on those first dates!

And What About Personality?

Your personality impacts how attractive people find you.

Sally: I went out with a guy last night.

Jessi: Was he cute?

Sally: He had a good personality.

I don’t know when a “good personality” became a euphemism for being unattractive. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with having a good personality!

In fact, having a pleasant personality might make you more attractive to certain people. Let’s look at a couple of scientific studies that prove this.

Science Backs It Up: Personality Matters in Attractiveness

A study at the Huazhong University in China discovered that certain positive personality traits made people more attractive.

Here’s how they did it: 120 people were shown photos of women with neutral expressions on their faces and asked to rate them on attractiveness. Two weeks later, they performed the same task, but this time half the photos had positive personality descriptions like kind and honest, and half had negative personality descriptions like mean and dishonest.

I’m sure you’ve already guessed this, but those photos with the positive descriptions were ranked higher for attractiveness.

Even if those women weren’t actually kind or honest, associating those qualities with their images made people — both men and women — find them more attractive than those with the negative descriptions.

People might assume that because you are kind that you might also be honest or even a good mother. At an evolutionary level, a man might be attracted to you if you have a good personality because he believes you might pass along those traits to your offspring, whether or not you actually have any together!

Allow me to nerd out on you just a bit. Psychologists have several theories about personality. One, the “Big Five” model, says that most people’s personality traits can be described in terms of the five major factors:

  1. Neuroticism
  2. Extraversion
  3. Agreeableness
  4. Conscientiousness
  5. Openness to experience

We all have varying levels of each of these traits. But then another theory considers that all of these can be lumped into one “superfactor,” also called a general factor of personality, or GFP. If you have a high GFP, you might be low in the neuroticism department, but high in the others. In general, a higher GFP indicates a good personality, and therefore more attractive as a person!

So I bring up all this science stuff to make a point: don’t take an online attractiveness quiz to figure out if you’re cute or not because it goes beyond what your face looks like. You could be the most beautiful woman in the world physically, but if you’re horrible to people, you won’t be beautiful at all, really.

If you want to feel more attractive, work on being nicer to the people around you.

When You Think About How Attractive You Are Too Much

If you’re stressing about how attractive you are, you might have BDD.

Like I said at the start of this article: it’s completely normal to wonder “how attractive am I.” But if you’re spending a significant portion of your life worrying about your flaws, this isn’t normal and you might need to be concerned about your behavior.

There’s this disorder called body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) that some people suffer from, which can cause them to obsess with real or perceived physical flaws. I’m not talking using the up-close mirror to whine about wrinkles for 30 seconds every morning.

I’m talking spending hours worrying about them. Being unable to function normally because of the stress this causes. Missing work or social functions because you don’t want people to see your crooked nose, giant thighs, or spaced-out eyes.

People who suffer from BDD might undergo plastic surgery to fix the imperfections they see, but may never actually get results that make them happy. Just look at Kerry Miles, a woman who has spent over £100,000 in an effort to turn herself into a human Barbie doll! She may very well suffer from body dysmorphic disorder, and may never reach her goal to turn into — for Pete’s sake — a doll.

It’s thought that BDD may be caused by life experiences like sexual trauma or abuse, as well as certain personality traits or genetic predisposition, and that 1.7 to 2.4% of the population suffers from it.

So consider how much space the topic of your attractiveness takes in your mind. Is it a normal, passing thought, or does it fester in your brain? Do you have a few things you’d change if you could (though you probably never will), or do you dislike some parts of your body so much that you would do anything to fix them as soon as possible? Are you obsessed with exercise in an effort to change your body, or do you cover your imperfections with baggy clothes constantly?

If you think you might have body dysmorphic disorder, talk to a mental health professional to find a treatment plan that helps you have a better and healthier self-image.

Conclusion:

If you came here looking for a definitive answer on how attractive you are, I’m sorry I couldn’t give it to you. But if you close your eyes and ask yourself do I feel attractive, you’ll get a better answer.

And hey, I’m not expecting that answer to be the same one day to the next. When you get back from getting a cut and color, you probably feel pretty attractive. But after an argument with your best friend, you might feel anything but.

You might feel sexy after going on a date with a man who couldn’t keep his hands off of you. But when you wake up with a hangover on Sunday morning, you feel like a shrew.

You see where I’m going with this?

Attractiveness is a moving target. It changes with your mood and confidence level, and, yes, with age.

At age 20, you might have thought you were fat and plain, but at age 40, you look at old photos and yearn for the day you were 4 dress sizes smaller. You cry over that youngster’s smooth skin and wish you’d appreciated it back then.

But you didn’t because you were young and didn’t know what you had.

Many women feel more beautiful the older they get. They gain confidence (something I’m all about, here on Sexy Confidence!) and stop comparing themselves to anyone else.

Because your attractiveness isn’t in relation to anyone else’s. It’s in relation to your own. Are you trying to be the most beautiful woman you can be every day? That doesn’t require investing in MAC and Maybelline stock; it requires you to be the best person you can be. It means being a giving friend. Listening when someone needs an ear. Smiling. Not gossiping or talking rudely about people.

If you’re trying to find a great guy, stop focusing so much on your looks and start paying better attention to your behavior. Don’t you want a man who is drawn to you by your amazing personality? Because if you’re together long-term, your personality will stay more or less the same, but your looks may change. As you age, your sharp wit and sunny disposition will continue to attract him to you.

As I said at the start: beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I hope by the end of this article that you’re starting to behold yourself in a more positive light and stop basing how attractive you are (in your head) on superficial characteristics! Say it with me: “I am attractive!”

What are your thoughts on how attractive you are to others? Please share in the comments below!

Who couldn’t use an extra dose of confidence? In my 21 Days to Sexy Confidence, I give you the tools you need to build self-esteem quickly! Check it out!

Pretty Hurts: We tried the new beauty-judging app so you don’t have to

Gone are the days where you need Instagram followers and your Mom to tell you how good looking you are.

Enter prettyscale.com. It’s a website/computer generated self-esteem crusher that does exactly what the name suggests: it measures your prettiness on a scale of 1-100. And how does it do that? Here’s what the website claims:

“PrettyScale measures face beauty by studying and testing the placement and sizes of different face features. The results are based on the face shape, distance between eyes and lips, mouth size and face symmetry.”

Symmetry. Got it. A simple math equation to tell you how pretty you are. What could go wrong? Aren’t you curious to know your score? I was. Naturally I tried it… in admittedly the most unnatural way possible. I made sure I was clean shaven, hair just right. Then, about 20 snaps later using soft lighting and careful cropping, I was ready to upload my best selfie. I was quite proud of myself when the site gave me an 88%: certified “pretty”. If only the people in high school who used to know me with braces and cystic acne could see me now.

To my surprise, the site doesn’t JUST tell you if you’re pretty or ugly, it goes into detail by listing off the things that are right and wrong with your face. For example, apparently I have a “normal forehead size” — lucky me!

(Source: prettyscale.com)

But, like most things in life, prettyscale.com will build you up, only to tear you down. My computer was suddenly judging me for my “small chin” and “bad face symmetry”. Oh. They even highlight your flaws in bold to be sure you won’t miss them. Pretty really does hurt. Anxiety immediately kicked in and I tried re-uploading more photos to fix my score (for the sole purpose of sharing it in this article, of course). But my percentage only got worse. It’s like the website was on to my scheme.

So what happens now that you have a complex about your small chin and wonk-eye? Nothing. Because you were warned with a scary disclaimer while your photo uploads.

(Source: prettyscale.com)

“If you have low-self esteem or/and confidence issues, please do not take the test.” See, I had my chance to turn back. So, like in most situations, I refused to go down alone. I thought it would be funny to share this with my friends. But learn from me… that is a bad idea. Even if you have the best looking friends in the world, any score given to them that they aren’t satisfied with WILL be your fault. They WILL blame you for their poor symmetry and 62% face.

So, to make everyone feel better about themselves, it became my goal to prove that this website is not a real indication of how beautiful anyone is. I decided to upload the face of 2017’s Most Beautiful Woman according to People magazine: Julia Roberts. This was her fifth time receiving the title, I figured she wouldn’t mind playing guinea pig. The magazine publishes an annual issue, listing their picks. And as you can see below, it includes “52 pages of beauties.”

(Source: People Magazine)(Source: prettyscale.com/People Magazine)

Apparently her nose is too long, her mouth is too wide, and her chin it too big. Their words, not mine. But on the bright side, she DOES have a normal sized forehead (she’s in great company). That should help her sleep at night. So in the end, we’re left with two options: either I’m prettier than Julia Roberts, or this website is just a joke. I’ll let you decide.

Website preys on the thousands of women who Google ‘Am I ugly?’

Sadly, around 10,000 women take to Google each month to ask “Am I ugly?”

And the top link on the search engine when you ask the question is a site which brutally rates your looks and points out imperfections on your face.

Pretty Scale launched in 2011 and works by analyzing photos to provide a score from one to 100 — ugly to beautiful.

Not only does it give you a cruel label, but it also breaks down your face to reveal exactly how you are falling short of being beautiful, from your nose size to your facial symmetry.

The site was created by a programmer in Pakistan and initially started as a simple site to “prank co-workers.”

It quickly boomed in popularity and now gets 20,000 to 40,000 hits a month, but a body image charity has slammed it as being “dangerous.”

Google

The Sun spoke to the creator of the “face beauty analysis test” site, who goes by the name Aqueel, about why he felt the need for the site.

Aqueel said: “There are people who believe in astrology and palmistry and other things. People always want to know about themselves from others. Why not try my website as well? That was the idea.”

“It started as a prank website but some of my co-workers took is seriously so I made it look more serious and even added things as golden ratio and other stuff.”

Aqueel revealed that the “prettiness” ranking is based on many factors.

The creator added: “Then it compares proportions of face features like is nose too big for lips etc.”

“It also checks for symmetry of face features. How does it decide what proportions are good or bad?”

“That data is based on average proportions of people considered beautiful in the media. The data is different for males and females but not for different ethnicities.”

“The algorithm to measure beauty has been changed so many times to fit all ethnicities but I cannot claim it fits for all ethnic backgrounds.”

“The app ignores all those colors and things and focus on facial features and proportions only.”

First step is uploading a photo into the application.

Pretty Scale

Second, adjust the image to match the facial wireframe.

Pretty Scale

Third, adjust where the corners of the eyes can be found in the image.

Pretty Scale

Fourth, frame the face in the photo.

Pretty Scale

Fifth, frame the nose.

Pretty Scale

Sixth, locate the mouth in the photo.

Pretty Scale

Lastly, receive your result.

Pretty Scale

Ad 7

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“But then there are problems with some ethnicities who have bigger noses or wide spaces between eyes.”

“How can they complain about it when they resort to plastic surgery for such things?”

Although the Pretty Scale creator called it a “stupid website,” the YMCA’s “Be Real Campaign” believes that sites like Pretty Scale are extremely dangerous.

Liam Preston, the head of the campaign, said to the Sun Online:

“Today’s beauty pressure is completely unrealistic and puts way too much pressure on people to look a certain way.”

“Seeing ‘perfect’ bodies and faces on TV, in magazines and online all the time means many people are feeling unhappy with their looks because they feel they can’t keep up.”

“The last thing we need is a website to compare our looks, telling us that we are not pretty enough. This is really dangerous for young people as more than half are already bullied about the way they look.”

“We should all care a little less about what we look like and more about our health and overall happiness.”

The Pretty Scale creator said that despite maintaining the webpage, they are aware of the dangers themselves.

They admitted: “Yes, I’m always worried. Especially about young people who take things like that seriously. Based on feedback I have put warnings and information that this is not a serious face analysis. It is done by a dumb computer program who cannot even see you so don’t take it seriously.”

“Moreover, you have to be very very out of proportion to be called ugly.”

“Since the site cannot actually see your facial features, it asks you to put lines for example at the corners of your lips etc. It’s most probably your fault if you don’t inform it about your facial features right.””

According to the creator, the only way to achieve 100 percent beauty on the site is to be mathematically perfect, according to the software’s standards.

However, they did say: “There is no reliable standard. If you are worried about your looks, ask about it from those who matter in your life, not some stupid internet website.”

SADLY around 10,000 women take to Google each month to ask “Am I ugly?”

And the top link on the search engine when you ask the question is a “dangerous” site which brutally rates your looks and points out imperfections on the face.

17 Pretty Scale anaylses your face and tells you if you are ‘ugly’ or ‘pretty’Credit: Prettyscale.com

Pretty Scale was launched in 2011 and works by analysing photos to provide a number from one to 100 — ugly to beautiful.

Not only does it give you a cruel label, but it also breaks down your face to reveal exactly how you are falling short of being beautiful, from your nose size to your facial symmetry.

The site was created by a programmer in Pakistan called Aqueel and initially started as a simple site to “prank co-workers”.

It quickly boomed in popularity and now gets 20,000 to 40,000 hits a month, but a body image charity has slammed it as being “dangerous”.

17 When you type in ‘Am I ugly?’ on Google, the site is the top resultCredit: Google 17 The site makes you pinpoint select areas of your face ready for analysingCredit: Prettyscale.com 17 Today I learned that I have a big chin, a long nose and bad facial symmetry, according to the app – delightfulCredit: Pretty Scale

Fabulous Online spoke to the creator of the “face beauty analysis test” site about why he felt the need for the site.

Aqueel said: “There are people who believe in astrology and palmistry and other things. People always want to know about themselves from others. Why not try my website as well? That was the idea.

“It started as a prank website but some of my co-workers took is seriously so I made it look more serious and even added things as golden ratio and other stuff.”

17 Brave Sun journalists put themselves up to the Pretty Scale ranking 17 The site labels you ‘ugly’ or ‘pretty’ and breaks down the results

Aqueel revealed that the “prettiness” ranking is based on many factors.

The creator added: “Then it compares proportions of face features like is nose too big for lips etc.

“It also checks for symmetry of face features. How does it decide what proportions are good or bad?

“That data is based on average proportions of people considered beautiful in media. The data is different from males and females but not for different ethnicities.

“The algorithm to measure beauty has been changed so many times to fit all ethnicities but I cannot claim it fits for all ethnic backgrounds.

“The app ignores all those colours and things and focus on face features and proportions only.

“But then there are problems with some ethnicities who have bigger noses or wide space between eyes.

“How can they complain about it when they resort to plastic surgery for such things.”

17 We tried the app on other Sun writers, such as the beautiful SophieCredit: SUPPLIED 17 Sophie was defined as 73 per cent on the app thanks to her ‘normal forehead size’ and ‘good nose for face’ 17 Fabulous writer Josie uploaded a shot of herself to Pretty Scale 17 Josie was told she has a good face shape and nose

Although the Pretty Scale creator called it a “stupid website”, the YMCA’s Be Real Campaign believes that sites like theirs are extremely dangerous.

Liam Preston, Head of the body image campaign, said to the Sun Online:

“Today’s beauty pressure is completely unrealistic and puts way too much pressure on people to look a certain way.

“Seeing ‘perfect’ bodies and faces on TV, in magazines and online all the time means many people are feeling unhappy with their looks because they feel they can’t keep up.

“The last thing we need is a website to compare our looks, telling us that we are not pretty enough. This is really dangerous for young people as more than half are already bullied about the way they look.

“We should all care a little less about what we look like and more about our health and overall happiness.”

17 Sun worker Dan also put himself up to the testCredit: SUPPLIED 17 Dan was happy with being told he ‘isn’t that bad’Credit: SUPPLIED 17 Journalist Maryse uploaded this shot to the website 17 Maryse was defined as ‘good looking’ via the website thanks to her normal chin and mouth size

The PrettyScale creator said that despite maintaining the webpage, they are aware of the dangers themselves.

They admitted: “Yes, I’m always worried. Specially about young people who take things like that seriously. Based on feedback I have put warnings and information that this is not a serious face analysis. It is done by a dumb computer program who cannot even see you so don’t take it seriously.

“Moreoever, You have to be very very out of proportion to be called ugly.

“Since the site cannot actually see your face features, it asks you to put lines for example at the corners of your lips etc. It’s most probably your fault if you don’t inform it about your face features right.”

17 The website does give a warning to avoid if you have a low self esteem, but is this enough?Credit: Prettyscale.com 17 We put prime minister Theresa May through the facial analysis website 17 Theresa scored one of the highest on the website

According to the creator, the only way to achieve 100 per cent beauty o

n the site is to be mathematically perfect, according to the software’s standards.

However, they did say: “There is no reliable standard. If you are worried about your looks, ask about it from those who matter in your life, not some stupid internet website.”

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Stop telling me I’m ‘beautiful.’ I’m ugly. It’s fine.


Oly Studio pearl round mirror (Courtesy of Candelabra )By Kristin Salaky Kristin Salaky is a social media editor and writer based in New York City. July 26, 2016

If you’re alive and online, you’ve seen the Dove “Real Beauty” ads, where people react to being called beautiful. They smile, break into tears and hug. These campaigns are meant to make me (and all women) feel good in their own skin. But while I love a good compliment, it doesn’t work on me.

I’m ugly, and I know it.

In case you think I’m kidding, let me make something perfectly plain: I’m not an idiot, my vision is fine. I know my thighs are too big, my face too undefined, that almost every part of me could use some work. I know that people see that. I’m not saying I don’t take pride in my appearance, but true physical beauty is a kind of social currency I cannot redeem.

This makes things harder, and not just in love and relationships. Random guys on dating apps have matched with me only to let me know how hideous I am. When I was young, I was the girl guys asked out as a joke, “She’s All That” style. More than once, a man has told me I’m “ugly as f—.”

I’ve had to work harder at friendships with the opposite sex because I don’t come in a pretty package. I struggle to keep people’s attention at parties and I find I’m more easily ignored in professional situations, even when I’ve got something to say. I’ve had people explain to me how I can improve my skin and diets I should try.

I am blessed to be friends with some amazing and strikingly beautiful women. They are generous and kind and when I’ve spoken on this subject before, they’re devastated. But when we go out together, I’m treated by men like an obstacle to get around. Sometimes, guys walks away from me mid-conversation to talk to a better-looking girl. When I write pieces on this subject or even allude to having an opinion online, anonymous Twitter trolls tell me I wouldn’t be so unattractive if I didn’t dye my hair, got a good chemical peel and stopped “eating Oreo’s more than vegetables.”

I’m not the only one to experience this. Attractive waiters earn more tips. Beautiful people get more job interviews, get promoted more quickly and make more money than their unattractive counterparts. They’re even seen as more “morally upright.” Studies have even shown a bias in juries when the defendant is attractive.

This is why the ad campaigns that tell everyone they’re beautiful are so dangerous. They link beauty with worthiness and kindness, doing nothing for the people thrust into the world knowing that simply isn’t true.

Instead, we should teach people, especially women, that their beauty doesn’t define them. We need to teach them that their worth comes from much more than their appearance. We need to stop shopping the narrative that everyone is beautiful (or could be, if they did x, y, z). We need to lift women up to be competitive workers, voracious learners and empathetic people. No matter what they look like.

This is a hard lesson to learn. It only sunk in for me when a well-meaning, drunk friend told me, “it’s crazy you don’t have guys crawling all over you just because of what you look like.” At first I smiled a pained smile, like I always do when people point out my appearance. But, it hit me: It is crazy. I know I’m worthy. I might not be beautiful, but that’s only one good quality among many. Playing with my appearance became fun again and I began to do things because I liked them, not for other people. I can’t ignore the effects it can have on me professionally and financially, but I can take away its power to hurt me mentally.

I am a good and loyal friend. I have found love not only romantically, but in my life, in the little things, in my career. I know the perfect ratio of butter to milk in mac and cheese. I am not mean to people on the Internet. I have good things about myself that people have to work to see. Getting through my appearance is just an extra wrapping that people need to get through to the present that is me.

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