Alcohol and keto diet

Contents

Keto alcohol – the best and the worst drinks

The numbers represent grams of carbs per a typical serving – for example one glass of wine or one draft beer. Note that sweet brands of wine or sparkling wine may contain more carbs, while other brands may contain a bit less.3

Wine

Even on a keto diet (below 20 grams per day) you can probably have a glass of wine fairly regularly. And on a moderate low-carb diet, wine is not a problem.

Please note that dry wines usually contain less than 0.5 grams of sugar per glass.4 The other substances, often counted as carbs, constitute miscellaneous remains from the fermentation process, like glycerol, that should have a minimal effect on blood sugar or insulin levels.5 Using the number 2 grams of carbs per glass of dry wine is conservative. All dry wines fit well within a keto diet.6

Sweet dessert wines, however, contain a lot more sugar.

Beer

Beer is a problem on keto. There’s a reason people talk about “beer bellies”. There are lots of rapidly digestible carbs in beer – it’s been called liquid bread.7 For that reason, unfortunately, most beers are a disaster for weight control and should be avoided on keto.

Note that the amount of carbs in beer vary depending on the brand. There are a few possible low-carb options for keto. Check out our keto beer guide below for details.

Spirits

The numbers represent grams of carbs per drink, e.g. what you’ll get if you order one in a bar.

When it comes to drinks, it’s pretty straightforward. Pure spirits like whiskey, brandy, cognac, vodka, gin, and tequila contain zero carbs and they are all fine on keto.

However, avoid sugar-sweetened drinks. Don’t add juice, soft drinks, or other sweeteners like sweet cream to spirits. Adding tonic to zero carb gin boosts its carbs to 16 grams per serving! Have vodka, soda water and twist of lime instead for a no-carb summer drink.

The worst option of all is to mix alcohol with soda or juice; this will be a sugar bomb.

Alcopops / wine coolers

The numbers represent grams of carbs (sugar) per bottle.

So, what about alcopops / wine coolers? They’re just like regular soda with alcohol in them, and should be avoided by everyone who wants to avoid drinking massive amounts of sugar.

Keto-friendly beers

The numbers above are the grams of carbs in one 12 oz. bottle of beer (355 ml).

There are huge differences between different brands, but most contain too many carbs to fit a keto diet. Even on a more liberal low-carb diet it might be wise to keep beer drinking as an occasional thing.

The exception is very light American beers. Many of them contain few carbs, so if you like them you are in luck. Check out the brands to the left in the graphic above.8

Top 5 keto alcoholic drinks

On a keto diet, you can still enjoy a delicious drink or two on special occasions. Even though many alcoholic drinks contain a lot of sugar, there are still some really good keto options, with little or no sugar or other carbs. Here’s our list of the top 5 keto alcoholic drinks.

  1. Champagne or sparkling wine (extra dry or brut) – one glass contains about 2 grams of net carbs.
  2. Pop the bubbly for a low carb toast to good health. Whether it is expensive Champagne from France, or other more affordable sparkling wines like Cava or Prosecco, from other countries, look for the driest versions and enjoy as an aperitif, with food or as a stand-alone drink.

  3. Dry wine – red or white – one glass contains about 2 grams of net carbs.
  4. “Beer is made by man, but wine is made by God” said Martin Luther. Some have called it the fourth macronutrient, after fat, protein and carbs. It has been part of human civilization for at least 8,000 years — and no wonder, it pairs so wonderfully with food and friends. Fortunately, dry wine from time-to-time is fine on a keto diet.

  5. “Skinny Bitch” – one long drink contains 0 grams of carbs.
  6. The go-to drink of the “Real Housewives of” TV franchise, skinny bitch has the country-club cachet but not the carbs of the old standby gin-and-tonic. Sparkling, light and refreshing, it consists of just vodka, soda water, and lime, perfect to sip and dish the dirt.

  7. Whiskey – one drink contains 0 grams of carbs.
  8. “Whiskey is liquid sunshine,” said George Bernard Shaw. Whether you like it neat, with rocks, soda or water, it’s zero carb and gluten free, even though it comes from fermented grains. Scotch, Irish, Canadian, Bourbon, Rye — whatever its name and style, it’s okay for a special occasion.

  9. Dry Martini – one cocktail contains 0 grams of carbs.
  10. In the books James Bond liked his martini with 3 parts Gordon’s gin, 1 part vodka, and a half jigger of Kina Lillet. On the screen it was always a vodka martini with a whisper of vermouth, garnished with a lemon twist. It’s a strong drink, even for a secret agent. Whether made with gin or vodka, and garnished with an olive, a lemon twist or a pearl onion, martinis remain one of the most popular aperitifs — shaken, not stirred, of course.

Your Guide to Keto and Alcohol: Will Drinking Kick You Out of Ketosis?

  • No surprise here: Alcohol isn’t exactly a health food. But you can enjoy the occasional drink on the keto diet without sacrificing your wellness goals.
  • On the keto diet, your body processes alcohol differently. That means the effects of alcohol might hit you faster. And over time, alcohol can derail your weight loss efforts.
  • Clear hard liquor is the most keto alcohol. Just be mindful of sugar-packed mixers. Dry, low-toxin wine may also work for some people.
  • Keep reading for Bulletproof tips to hack your hangover.

Is it possible to enjoy both a keto lifestyle and alcohol? In a word: Kinda.

Alcohol — even red wine — isn’t a health food. It’s associated with high blood pressure, inflammation, a weakened immune system and even cancer. With that said, it’s common to enjoy a drink when you’re celebrating or socializing. So, how does booze fit into the keto lifestyle?

Although drinking on a keto diet won’t necessarily derail your progress, it will slow things down a bit. Read on for the definitive guide to keto and alcohol. Plus, learn how alcohol affects your body and Bulletproof tips to hack your hangover.

Get 3 Keto Resources for FREE!

Subscribe to our Keto mailing list to get a free keto shopping guide and regular tips for keto dieters. Includes 3 free downloads: The Keto Alcohol Guide, The Keto Food List, and a 7 Day Keto Meal Plan.

Alcohol and the fat-burning process

Alcohol has about 7 calories per gram, so it’s sometimes classified as the fourth macronutrient. But unlike carbs, fats and protein, it’s not essential. You don’t need it to survive.

While it’s obvious that sweet cocktails and beer are full of sugar and carbs that can immediately bring you out of ketosis, straight liquor and dry wine can also cause issues for some people.

Take a drink like a vodka soda: It has very few calories and even fewer grams of sugar. But it’s not the calories in this simple drink that can cause a problem; it’s how the body processes the liquor in the first place.

On the keto diet, your body uses fat for energy instead of carbs. In the absence of carbs, your liver turns fat into energy molecules called ketones. When you drink alcohol, your body begins to metabolize the booze — which means it breaks it down.

The thing is, when you’re keto, your liver focuses all of its attention on the metabolized alcohol instead of fat. Until all the alcohol has been processed, your body won’t produce ketones from fat. This slows down the fat-burning process, and potentially slows down your weight loss goals.

The bottom line: If you’re a very occasional spirits drinker, alcohol probably won’t derail your keto lifestyle. But if you find yourself drinking high-carb beverages, or drinking often during the week or every weekend, you might be slowing down the fat-burning you want on keto.

Related: Ketosis and the Ketogenic Diet Explained: A Complete Beginner’s Guide

Why keto drinkers get drunk fast

Carbs are great for managing that tipsy feeling. Pasta, pizza and bread are full of glucose, which your body burns relatively quickly. This slows down the metabolization of alcohol, which helps reduce blood alcohol levels.

But when you’re living a ketogenic lifestyle, you’re eating very few carbs. That means alcohol is processed faster — which leads to you feeling tipsy or drunk much quicker.

Willpower, keto and alcohol

Maintaining a healthy ketogenic lifestyle requires focus and willpower. When you drink, your inhibitions and willpower weaken. This is why it’s so easy to go for a few pieces of pizza at 2 a.m. after a night of drinking instead of a handful of pistachios and a glass of water.

So even if you choose your liquor carefully, the choices you make after those drinks (i.e. pizza or fast food) may end up throwing you out of ketosis. This isn’t meant to be a buzzkill — it’s simply something more to consider when opting for a second or third drink.

Related: 16 Best Keto Snacks for Every Craving

Does alcohol actually increase ketosis?

If you’ve ever heard the phrase “drinking increases ketosis,” you’re only getting half the story.

A small study from 1970 illustrated how alcohol consumption and a high-fat diet increased “ketonuria” — aka more ketones were found in the volunteers’ urine. Here’s the scientific explanation: Researchers theorized the ketonuria was caused by a “delayed change in intermediary metabolism” from alcohol-induced glycogen depletion.

The bottom line: Drinking alcohol on the keto diet might result in a quick burst of ketone activity, but your liver will eventually start to use alcohol for energy instead of fat. That means less fat-burning over time.

The best keto alcohol options

Alcohol is not part of the Bulletproof Diet. However, if you want to go out and enjoy a drink or two with friends, it’s still possible to do so on a keto diet. Here is your definitive guide to keto-friendly alcohol.

Hard liquor

Most clear liquors that are around 40 percent alcohol (vodka, whiskey, gin, scotch, brandy, rum and tequila) contain 0 grams of carbs and sugars on their own, which means they’re keto-friendly in moderation.

The issue arrives if you want to mix your liquor with something to make it more palatable.

Mixing your spirits with straight water or seltzer is perfectly acceptable on keto, but tonic water (which is a bitter soda made from quinine) contains 32 to 33 grams of carbs per 12 ounces. Likewise, when you mix hard liquor with things like fruit juice, sodas or behind-the-bar “mixers” (which are usually full of sugar), you’re opening yourself up to a lot of liquid carbs.

If you’re really craving a little something more than just plain tequila on the rocks, you can still enjoy keto-friendly drinks that swap out sugary mixers, such as a keto White Russian or strawberry margarita.

Keep in mind that flavored alcohols (coconut-flavored vodka, for instance) can and often do contain extra sugar. Avoid them whenever possible.

While most cheap wine (think the stuff under $10 or that comes in a box), can come with residual sugar, if you stick to very dry red or white wine, you can still have a glass with dinner. Typically, dry wines have about 1 gram or less of sugar per ounce, and the usual serving is 5 ounces, so pour accordingly.

Keep in mind that while some dry wines might be OK on keto, most are not Bulletproof. Typical wine contains up to 76 different additives that aren’t disclosed on their labels — like artificial coloring, yeast, ammonia, defoaming agents and metals. They can carry carcinogenic mycotoxins from moldy vats or poor fermentation, too.

A few keto-friendly, dry white wines include:

  • Sauvignon blanc (0.6g carbs per ounce)
  • Pinot blanc: (0.57g carbs per ounce)
  • Italian pinot grigio (0.6g carbs per ounce)

A few keto-friendly, dry red wines include:

  • Cabernet sauvignon (0.75g carbs per ounce)
  • Pinot noir (0.68g carbs per ounce)
  • Merlot (0.74g carbs per ounce)

You can get a more comprehensive list of carbohydrate content by wine type here. Organic, biodynamic Dry Farm Wines tests their wines in labs to ensure they’re free of mold and additives — and its founders are keto.

Because of its ingredient list (barley, hops, yeast and water), beer is something to be avoided when on a Bulletproof and keto diet. The barley is broken down into sugar maltose, which is what the yeast acts on, creating a much higher carb count than straight liquor.

Beer can contain gluten, yeast, ochratoxin A and other mold toxins. If you’re going to drink beer, know that it’s not Bulletproof, and at least make it gluten-free.

Here is one keto-friendly, gluten-free beer to try: Omission Brewing Co. Ultimate Light Golden Ale (5 grams of carbs per 12-ounce serving). Looking for more low-carb beers? Check out this list.

Be sure to download the Bulletproof Keto Alcohol Guide for a more thorough breakdown and handy visual aide below.

Yes, you can drink alcohol on the keto diet— but there’s a catch

  • Drinking alcohol won’t stop ketosis, but it will impact it.
  • Wine is more keto-friendly than beer because of the carb content.
  • Drinking while on the keto diet can make your hangovers worse.
  • Drinking alcohol might make it more difficult to resist non-keto temptations.

If you’re following a ketogenic diet, you probably know that high-carb treats are off-limits. But can you drink alcohol while keto?

The short answer: yes. However, there are certain alcoholic drinks you might want to avoid if you’re looking to stay in ketosis. Drinking while following a keto diet can also have some unexpected side effects.

Here’s what you should know about drinking alcohol if you’re keto.

First of all, you can drink alcohol and stay in ketosis. But there’s a catch.

Though one glass of something strong won’t knock your body out of ketosis, drinking alcohol while following a keto diet will affect your progress. Specifically, it will slow down your rate of ketosis.

“The liver can make ketones out of alcohol,” Atkins nutritionist Colette Heimowitz told Elite Daily. “So technically, when you drink, you’ll continue to produce ketones and will remain in ketosis.”

However, your body treats ethanol (i.e. alcohol) as a toxin and will work to get rid of it ASAP.

“The liver will start to process alcohol as quickly as possible, which means it is used by the body before all other nutrients, including fat, so it slows the process of converting fatty acids to ketones,” explains health and wellness practitioner Richard Purvis to Elite Daily.

Drinking alcohol won’t erase all your progress, but it will impact ketosis.

Some alcoholic drinks are carbohydrate bombs, while others are relatively keto-friendly.

Wine is a popular alcohol choice for those on the keto diet. Le Vin Parfait/Flickr When it comes to staying in ketosis, not all alcoholic options are equal.

“The short version: wine is much lower in carbs than beer, so most people who eat keto choose wine. Pure spirits like whiskey and vodka contain zero carbs, but watch out for sweet drinks – they may contain massive amounts of sugar,” advised Andreas Eenfeldt, MD, via Diet Doctor.

If you’re looking to indulge in an alcohol beverage while sticking to a keto diet, opt for lower carb drink options and avoid over-the-top cocktails.

Liquor with 40% alcohol by volume (80 proof) or higher will typically have 0 grams net carbs, according to Ruled.me. The USDA reports that a serving of pinot noir has around four grams of carbs, and 1.5-ounce pour of whiskey in diet cola has less than one carb, according to Nutritionix. You can also swap out tonic for soda in mixed drinks for an extra reduction in net carbs.

Be prepared for worse hangovers if you drink while following a keto diet.

Eating a carb-heavy meal before drinking can keep you from getting drunk too quickly. By the same token, following a strict keto diet can lead to becoming intoxicated more quickly and suffering a worse hangover.

However, skipping the carbs can have an adverse effect on your alcohol tolerance and ability to stave off a killer hangover.

“When you’re in ketosis, alcohol hits your system faster and stronger than it did when your body was housing more carbohydrates. Your alcohol tolerance plummets to near zero when you’re in ketosis,” Dr. Anthony Gustin, D.C., M.S. wrote on Perfect Keto.

If you’re thinking of throwing back a few shots while on a ketogenic diet, you should be prepared for a stronger hangover.

You should also consider whether alcohol reduces your ability to resist non-keto temptations.

It might make it more difficult to resist non-keto sources of temptation. Richard Allaway/Flickr You likely know that alcohol can lower your social inhibitions, but having a few glasses of wine might also make you less able to resist the siren call of late-night French fries.

“You’ll be more likely to overeat unhealthy foods since your inhibitions are lowered. This can make your stomach seem like a bottomless pit, scrounging for more calories as soon as you finish your first drink,” said Dr. Gustin on Perfect Keto.

If you know that having a few drinks gives you the munchies, you might want to opt for water to avoid caving to temptation.

For more great stories, head to INSIDER’s homepage.

This post may contain affiliate links, which help keep this content free. (Full disclosure)

Are you wondering about alcohol on a keto diet? Whether it will stop ketosis or affect your progress? If keto friendly alcohol drinks exist? What low carb cocktails and keto cocktails are the healthiest? You’ve come to the right spot. I’m sharing this massive guide to answer all of these questions and more. I’ll dive into what your options are for low carb alcoholic drinks, and the low carb drinks you should choose to ensure that you stay in ketosis.

There are many times when you’re looking for keto drinks besides water. Maybe it’s a celebration, maybe it’s a work happy hour, or maybe you just want to enjoy some keto cocktails! Whatever your reason, drinking alcohol on keto is just fine – so long as you know what to drink and you keep it in moderation.

In this guide you’ll find ideas for keto friendly alcohol drinks (of course!), but also more about how alcohol can affect you if you’re following a keto diet, the best low carb alcohol to enjoy, what to look for in low carb mixed drinks, and the counts of carbs in beer (various varieties!).

Before we get to the guide for alcohol on keto and the low carb alcoholic drinks, check the guide for how to start a keto diet and the keto food list, so that you understand how it works overall. You may also want to read about keto flu symptoms and remedies, to make sure you avoid or remedy that before trying to add alcohol.

Can You Drink Alcohol On The Keto Diet?

Yes, you can drink alcohol on keto. But, you need to choose the right low carb alcoholic drinks and enjoy them in moderation.

Does Alcohol Stop Ketosis?

No, alcohol itself will not kick you out of ketosis. (Alcohol is not sugar and does not spike blood sugar, which is what kicks you out of ketosis.)

However, alcohol de-prioritizes utilization of fat to make ketones.

Here is the difference in metabolism on “normal keto” versus when you drink alcohol on keto:

  • When you follow a keto diet, your body burns fat (from your food and your body) for fuel and produces ketones.
  • When you drink alcohol on keto, your body sees the alcohol as poison and its first priority is to get rid of it (by metabolizing it). So, your body stops breaking down both sugar and fat in order to break down the alcohol instead. That means that any excess sugar or fat is more prone to get stored, in the form of glycogen in the liver (for any trace amounts of sugar) and primarily body fat.

Why Does Keto Lower Alcohol Tolerance?

To understand why you get drunk faster on keto, you need to understand how your liver works (to some extent).

Your liver has many functions, but the ones important for the keto and alcohol consumption include:

  • Storage of extra glucose (in the form of glycogen) and its release when necessary
  • Blood detoxification and purification, including the processing of alcohol

When you eat a diet high in carbohydrates, the liver stores plenty of glycogen. The storage and release of glycogen in the liver slows down alcohol metabolism. This is one of the reasons that eating carbs can help you feel less drunk.

When you are in ketosis, the liver stores very little glycogen, and this causes alcohol to be metabolized a lot faster. Therefore, the alcohol will enter your bloodstream more quickly and your alcohol tolerance will be lower.

What Alcohol Can You Drink On Keto?

So, what drinks are ok on keto? There are a few different categories of low carb alcoholic drinks and keto friendly alcohol drinks:

  • Hard Liquor – Vodka, rum, tequila, gin, brandy, whiskey, etc. Most of these have 0 carbs, which is great, but you need to be careful with what you mix them with.
  • Dry Wine – Dry red wine, dry white wine, dry rose wine, dry sparkling wine, etc.
  • Light Beer – Most light beers are fine, but you can look up the carb counts of your favorite brands.
  • Light Seltzers – These are basically spiked flavored seltzer water, with no sugar added.

What Alcohol To Avoid On Keto?

And here is a list of NOT keto friendly alcohol drinks:

  • Most mixed drinks – Anything with simple syrup, agave, margarita mix, sweet & sour mix, vermouth, etc. Most mixed drinks will fall into this category.
  • Drinks with soda or juice – Including regular cola or lemon-lime soda, ginger ale, orange juice, cranberry juice, etc.
  • Sweet wines – Such as riesling, moscato, port, sherry, etc.
  • Liqueurs – These are loaded with sugar and typically made with some kind of syrup.
  • Hard ciders or wine coolers – These are essentially spiked fruit juice.
  • Sangrias – The wine in them is usually fine, but the added fruit, sugar, and/or juice is not.

Alcohol On Keto: The Best Low Carb Alcoholic Drinks Guide:
Pin it to save for later!

Follow Wholesome Yum on Pinterest

Carb Counts In Low Carb Drinks

The table below shows the carb counts in the best drinks for keto – hard liquor, wine, light beer, and seltzers. You can read more about mixers further below.

Type Drink Serving Size Net Carbs Calories
Hard liquor Vodka 1.5 fl oz 0g 97
Hard liquor Rum (unflavored) 1.5 fl oz 0g 97
Hard liquor Tequila 1.5 fl oz 0g 97
Hard liquor Gin 1.5 fl oz 0g 110
Hard liquor Brandy & cognac 1.5 fl oz 0g – 3g 96
Hard liquor Whiskey 1.5 fl oz 0g 105
Red wine Cabernet sauvignon 5 fl oz 3.8g 123
Red wine Merlot 5 fl oz 3.7g 123
Red wine Pinor noir 5 fl oz 3.4g 122
Red wine Syrah 5 fl oz 3.8g 123
White wine Chardonnay 5 fl oz 3.4g 122
White wine Pinot grigio 5 fl oz 3g 123
White wine Riesling 5 fl oz 5.5g 120
Sparkling wine Cava 5 fl oz 2.5g 128
Sparkling wine Champagne 5 fl oz 4g 125
Sparkling wine Dry sparkling wine 5 fl oz 4g 125
Beer Ultra light beer – Budweiser Select 55, Michelob Ultra, Miller 64 1 bottle (~12 oz) 0.5g – 2.6g 55-95
Beer Very light beer – Beck’s Premier Light, Budweiser Select, Miller Lite 1 bottle (~12 oz) 3.1g – 3.7g 64-95
Beer Light beer – Amstel Light, Bud Light, Coors Light, Heineken Light, Miller Chill 1 bottle (~12 oz) 4g – 6.8g 95-104
Spiked seltzer Spiked seltzer 1 bottle (~12 oz) 2g – 5g 100-140

Is Wine Ok On Keto?

Yes, you can drink wine on keto in moderation. Choose dry wines over sweet.

Refer to the table above for wine carb counts based on type.

I personally love natural Dry Farm Wines. They have no sugar and low carbs (less than 1 gram per liter!), low sulfites, no artificial additives, and must pass incredibly strict standards for taste. If you want to try them out, they’re offering my friends (YOU!) a bottle of wine for $0.01 (YES, A PENNY!) with your first order.

Can I Drink Beer On Keto?

Yes, you can drink light beer on keto in moderation. There are carbs in beer, but as you can see in the list below, they range from about 2 grams – 7 grams, so choose appropriately!

Here are some low carb beer options, perfect for keto:

  • Amstel Light – 5g net carbs
  • Beck’s Premier Light – 3.2g net carbs
  • Budweiser Select 55, Budweiser Select, Bud Light – 1.9g, 3.1g and 6.6g net carbs, respectively
  • Coors Light – 5g net carbs
  • Heineken Light – 6.8g net carbs
  • Michelob Ultra – 2.6g net carbs
  • Miller 64, Miller Chill, Miller Lite – 2.4g, 3.2g, and 4g net carbs, respectively

What Is The Lowest Carb Cocktail?

Put simply, the lowest carb cocktail is one that does not have any sugar added. There are several options, but the formula for keto cocktails is the same.

If you are looking for keto friendly cocktails to order at a bar, your best bet is to…

1) Choose a hard liquor:

  • Vodka
  • Rum
  • Tequila
  • Gin
  • Brandy
  • Whiskey

2) Add a sugar-free mixer:

  • Soda water – Also called seltzer water or club soda.
  • Unsweetened iced tea – Flavors are fine too, as long as they are unsweetened.
  • Lemon or lime juice – Specify “no sugar or simple syrup” to make it clear that you only want the lime juice. Typically you’ll also want to add some water (still or sparkling) to dilute the sour citrus.
  • Diet soda – These will not kick you out of ketosis, but typically use artificial sweeteners. Use in moderation.
  • Sugar-free energy drinks – Same warning as diet soda above.

You can also make your own keto friendly alcohol drinks at home. I’ll share some low carb cocktails for you to make below.

But first, I want to cover the not-so-fun part: why we shouldn’t go crazy with the alcohol on a keto diet…

Reasons To Limit Alcohol On Keto

There are many reasons to limit alcohol on keto, and if you’ve ever had a few too many drinks, you probably are familiar with the reasons:

1) Alcohol reduces self-control.

Alcohol actually changes your brain chemistry, which can impact your mood, your behavior, your memory, and more. Higher levels of norepinephrine can result in an increase in impulsivity, which can lead us to make decisions we wouldn’t normally make. Such as eating things you normally wouldn’t.

2) Alcohol can stall weight loss even if you stay in ketosis.

Let me explain how a few low carb vodka drinks can stall weight loss. In a nutshell, your body will prioritize getting rid of the alcohol before it burns any sugar or fat (from your food or your body). This means both sugar and fat are more likely to get stored as body fat when you drink alcohol. For more detail, see the “Does Alcohol Stop Ketosis?” section above.

3) Alcohol has a lot of calories.

Alcohol has 7 calories per gram (compared to 9 calories per gram of fat, 4 calories per gram of protein, and 4 calories per gram of carbs), which is relatively high.

While calories may not be our #1 focus on the keto diet, they do still count! And calories from alcohol are not providing any sort of nutrition, so there is no benefit (or use!) for these calories.

4) Alcohol can increase hunger or cravings.

Urban dictionary defines this as “drunchies” aka drunk munchies, but there is actually some science behind it. Essentially, your brain goes into starvation mode because certain neurons that deal with hunger are activated when you are intoxicated. In addition to alcohol reducing self-control, alcohol make it difficult to stick on your diet.

5) Alcohol on keto may amplify hangovers.

As mentioned above, alcoholic drinks on keto are metabolized much faster and can lead you to feeling drunk quicker. If you don’t keep your keto drinks to a moderate level, you’ll feel even worse the next day.

6) Alcohol can dehydrate you.

Alcohol causes your body to release more fluid, leaving you dehydrated, which will leave you feeling terrible. Re-hydrate with water if you’re drinking alcohol on keto.

So, How Can You Have Alcohol On Keto?

Despite the warnings above, you can still enjoy alcohol on a low carb diet. As cliche as it sounds, the key is to do drink responsibly. 🙂

Here is how to drink alcohol on keto:

  • Drink in moderation. There’s no reason to miss out on an occasional drink when you are out, but limit it to one or two. This will not only keep carbs and calories in check, it will also decrease the chance of stalling weight loss or a hangover the next day.
  • Drink plenty of water. Aim for a glass of water for every drink you have, and an extra one before bed. This will reduce dehydration and you’ll be less likely to get a hangover.
  • Choose low carb drink options. I covered low carb alcohol choices at a bar above, but if you miss classic sugar-laden mixed drinks, check out the list below for low carb drink recipes to make at home.

Low Carb Keto Cocktail Recipes

Now that you know everything you need to know about alcohol on keto, I’m excited to share some low carb keto cocktails that you can make at home!

These keto friendly, low carb alcoholic drink recipes are all naturally low in sugars and super easy to make:

  • Keto Skinny Margarita – This 5 ingredient skinny margarita low carb, paleo, and naturally sweetened.
  • Keto Mudslide – You won’t believe that this dessert drink is keto-friendly!
  • Skinny Raspberry Lime Rickey – This beautiful cocktail has just 16 calories and 4 grams of carbs per serving.
  • Low Carb Strawberry Daiquiri – Refreshing, light, and sweet.
  • Low Carb Raspberry Sangria – No need for extra sugars or juice in this low carb sangria recipe.
  • Tequila Lemonade – Best enjoyed outside on a hot day. It’s
  • Low Carb Margarita Sorbet – The perfect summer dessert for a Mexican meal.
  • Copycat Bailey’s Irish Cream – You’ll want to pour this decadent drink in just about everything.
  • Barbados Rum Punch – This one will have you feeling like you’re on the beach.
  • Tequila Sunset – This infused tequila gives great flavor to this drink, and looks pretty, too!
  • Wild Berry Mimosa – Perfect for parties, this bright drink is super festive.
  • Keto Low Carb Mojito – This is currently my favorite keto alcoholic drink recipe! My husband actually came up with it by modifying a mojito at a restaurant and asking them to leave out the simple syrup. You can order it at virtually any bar (just ask for a mojito with no simple syrup or sweetener of any kind), but it’s easy to make at home as well. Find this skinny mojito recipe below!

So there you have it. The Ultimate Guide to Keto Cocktails! As you’ve learned, there are many keto friendly alcohol drinks out there, and there’s no reason you can’t enjoy some keto cocktails in moderation. Cheers to that!

Sugar-Free Low Carb Skinny Mojito Recipe:
Pin it to save for later!

More Low Carb Recipes To Love

Sugar-Free Low Carb Skinny Mojito Recipe

This sugar-free low carb skinny mojito recipe has just 3 grams carbs and is incredibly refreshing.

Course Drinks Cuisine American Keyword keto cocktails, low carb drinks, skinny mojito recipe Calories 109 kcal Prep Time 5 minutes Total Time 5 minutes Author Maya Krampf from WholesomeYum.com Servings 2 servings

Recipe Video

Click or tap on the image below to play the video. It’s the easiest way to learn how to make this recipe!

Ingredients

Click underlined ingredients to buy them!
Please ensure Safari reader mode is OFF to view ingredients.

  • 6 tbsp Lime juice
  • 16 leaves Fresh mint
  • 2 cups Ice cubes
  • 3 oz White rum (or tequila)
  • 1 cup Sparkling water (or enough to fill the glass)

Instructions

RECIPE TIPS + VIDEO in the post above, nutrition info + recipe notes below!

Click on the times in the instructions below to start a kitchen timer while you cook.

  1. Divide the lime juice and mint leaves among 2 glasses. Mash the mint leaves using a muddler or spoon.

  2. Fill the glasses almost to the top with ice.

  3. Add 1.5 fl oz (44 mL) tequila or rum to each glass. Fill the glasses to the top with carbonated water. Use a straw or muddler to stir.

Recipe Notes

Serving size: 1 glass, or 1/2 the recipe.

This drink is unsweetened, and tastes light and lime-y. If you want it sweet, you can add liquid natural sweetener, such as pure stevia or pure monk fruit drops to taste.

Video Showing How To Make Sugar-Free Mojitos:

Don’t miss the VIDEO above – it’s the easiest way to learn how to make Sugar-Free Mojitos!

Nutrition Information Per Serving

Nutrition Facts Amount per serving. Serving size in recipe notes above. Calories 109 Fat 0g Protein 0g Total Carbs 3g Net Carbs 3g Fiber 0g Sugar 0g

Where does nutrition info come from? Nutrition facts are provided as a courtesy, sourced from the USDA Food Database. You can find individual ingredient carb counts we use in the Low Carb & Keto Food List. Carb count excludes sugar alcohols. Net carb count excludes both fiber and sugar alcohols, because these do not affect blood sugar in most people. We try to be accurate, but feel free to make your own calculations.

More Low Carb & Keto Support

If you want to know more about how to start a low carb diet, want to substitute sweeteners, need a food list, or need support, check these guides:

Low Carb & Keto Diet Plan
Starter Guide Sweetener Conversion Calculator Keto Low Carb Macro Calculator Low Carb Keto Food List + Printable PDF

© Copyright Maya Krampf for Wholesome Yum. We’d LOVE for you to share a link to this recipe, but please DO NOT COPY/PASTE the recipe instructions to social media or websites. You may share a photo with a link back instead.

Did you make this recipe?

★★★★★

Share a recipe pic with #wholesomeyum on Instagram or in our Facebook support group.

Join the Easy Keto Challenge to enter monthly giveaways every time you share your pics of my recipes!

Shop My Must-Have Keto Sweeteners

Use the buttons below to buy my new Besti keto sugar replacements, developed by Wholesome Yum!

GRANULATED ERYTHRITOL MONK FRUIT ALLULOSE BLEND ALLULOSE
SWEETENER POWDERED ERYTHRITOL

Get the full low carb pantry shopping list, browse low carb product discounts, and visit my Amazon Shop!

That isn’t necessarily good news. Very dry fizz can be unremittingly tart, even a shade sappy or grassy, green and peppery. Not fun (and fizz should always be fun). Without recourse to that populist plug of sugar, these are difficult sparklers to craft.

“They are hard to get right,” admits James Simpson, UK managing director of Champagne Pol Roger, which makes a delicious dry wine, Pol Roger Pure Extra Brut. “The best and ripest fruit must be selected for the very dry cuvées, and the quality of the winemaking must be spot on,” he says.

Michael Drappier of Champagne Drappier agrees that the grapes for these special champagnes have to be “selected very carefully indeed, from the right vineyards for perfect ripeness, as we don’t have the option to correct them with sugar in the bottle”. Drappier has made brut nature wines since the mid-1990s, but Michel readily agrees they are not for everyone. “The style is quite extreme, the opposite of a crowd-pleaser, which is more the purpose of a brut. But when they are good, they are so clean and sharply focused, tasting purely of the raw material, the grapes themselves.”

Naturally, he chills Drappier Brut Nature Zero Dosage for an aperitif, but matches it with fresh goat’s cheese too and with “simple, perfect Japanese food”. James Simpson also suggests pairing very dry champagne with sushi and sashimi, as well as with oysters.

So if you find your sparkler tastes a little on the sweet side (or you’re really desperate to shed a few pounds before your summer holiday), switch it. Below are some recommended dry buys.

Skinny champagnes to try

Champagne Drappier Brut Nature Zero Dosage NV, France (slurp.co.uk, Oakham Wines, Vagabond, Handford Wines, £38.99)

100 per cent pinot noir and super-fresh, with crunchy, tangy yellow apples, a whisper of red berries and a long, refreshing citrus streak with toasted hazelnut hints.

The ketogenic diet is known for being restrictive. The low-carb, high-fat diet only allows you to get about 10% of your daily calories come from carbs – andto maintain ketosis(the process by which your body uses fat as an energy source rather than carbs), dietitians say it’s best to keep your carb intake between 20-30 grams per day.

© Provided by Hearst Communications, Inc 5 Drinks That Are OK to Have on the Keto Diet

Naturally, this means you’ll have to ration out your carbs for when you really, really want them. This means that you probably won’t be drinking your favorite sugary beverages on the Keto Diet. Even so-called “healthy” drinks are chock-full of carbs: an eight-ounce glass of orange juice, for instance, has 27 grams of carbohydrates.

So what can you sip freely and what should your avoid? Here’s a handy keto-friendly beverage guide.

Can you drink juice on the keto diet?

© Gallery Stock 5 Drinks That Are OK to Have on the Keto Diet

Only if it’s diet or reduced sugar juice. Most fruit juices are high in carbs, which makes them almost impossible to drink on the Keto Diet, according to Dr. Mike Israetel, a sports nutrition consultant and professor of exercise science at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA. Case in point: eight ounces of cranberry juice has 30 grams of carbs. Apple juice? That’s roughly 24 grams of carbs.

That said, many brands offer diet or reduced sugar juices that are lower in carbohydrates. These products are packaged similarly to the full-calorie versions, so Israetel says you’ll need to read the nutrition label to ensure your juices are really low-carb.

Check out Langers Healthy Balance Juice Cocktail, which only has five calories and five grams of carbs per eight-ounce serving.

Can you drink tea and coffee on the keto diet?

Yes. Plain, unsweetened coffee and tea served black are keto-friendly. If you drink your coffee with milk, however, that may be a problem, as one cup of whole milk has almost 13 grams of carbs. If you’re on the keto diet, Israetel recommends using heavy cream. A tablespoon has less than one gram of carbohydrates. There are even new, flavored creamers specifically for people who miss flavored coffee or tea on the keto diet.

Video: Keto Coffee Will Keep You Full All Morning Long (Delish)

No, but diet soda is OK. Unsurprisingly, regular soft drinks are out, as a single 12-ounce can of Pepsi has 41 grams of carbohydrates. If you want to satisfy your soda craving, you’ll have to opt for diet sodas, which use artificial sweeteners. The same serving of Diet Pepsi has zero carbs.

According to Israetel, the fake sugars won’t knock you out of ketosis. But he does say that artificial sugars, in addition to raising numerous health concerns, may trigger cravings that cause people to eat more. Numerous studies in insects and mice have linked overeating to consumption of synthetic sugars, presumably because the substance triggers cravings for more sugar,Scientific Americanreported.

© Getty Images alcohol lower blood pressure

Not really. Hardcore keto followers may want to avoid happy hour altogether, as alcohol “stops fat loss dead in its tracks,” Israetel says. Drinking alcohol bumps you out of ketosis, but only temporarily, as your body processes alcohol relatively quickly, he says.

Don’t want to give up booze, but still want to burn fat? Beer and wine are high in carbs, so you’ll want to stick to liquor, like vodka or whiskey, and drink it on the rocks. Going out for cocktails will also prove difficult, but you can easily make a low-carb mojito or margarita at home.

© Getty Images 7 Healthy Snacks That Will Tame Your Appetite

Yes. Protein shakes are an easy on-the-go breakfast for keto dieters who can’t just pick up a smoothie. In fact, Israetel says chocolate protein powders make a great addition to coffee if you’re used to picking up a mocha on your way to the office.

Of course, not all protein powders are low in carbohydrates, so you’ll have to check the label. Israetel recommends a powder that contains casein protein, which is digested slowly to help you stay full longer. Or, you could try a protein powder formulated to be nearly carb-free for keto dieters.

One scoop of Perfect Keto protein powder has only a single gram of carbs.

The ketogenic diet is known for being restrictive. The low-carb, high-fat diet only allows you to get about 10% of your daily calories come from carbs — and to maintain ketosis (the process by which your body uses fat as an energy source rather than carbs), dietitians say it’s best to keep your carb intake between 20-30 grams per day.

Naturally, this means you’ll have to ration out your carbs for when you really, really want them. This means that you probably won’t be drinking your favorite sugary beverages on the Keto Diet. Even so-called “healthy” drinks are chock-full of carbs: an eight-ounce glass of orange juice, for instance, has 27 grams of carbohydrates.

So what can you sip freely and what should your avoid? Here’s a handy keto-friendly beverage guide.

intek1Getty Images

Only if it’s diet or reduced sugar juice. Most fruit juices are high in carbs, which makes them almost impossible to drink on the Keto Diet, according to Dr. Mike Israetel, a sports nutrition consultant and former professor of exercise science at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA. Case in point: eight ounces of cranberry juice has 30 grams of carbs. Apple juice? That’s roughly 24 grams of carbs.

That said, there are diet or reduced sugar juices that contain minimal carbohydrates. These products are packaged similarly to the full-calorie versions, so Israetel says you’ll need to read the nutrition label to ensure your juices are really low-carb.

Stefka PavlovaGetty Images

Yes. Plain, unsweetened coffee and tea served black are keto-friendly. If you drink your coffee with milk, however, that may be a problem, as one cup of whole milk has almost 13 grams of carbs. If you’re on the keto diet, Israetel recommends using heavy cream. A tablespoon has less than one gram of carbohydrates. There are even new, flavored creamers specifically for people who miss flavored coffee or tea on the Keto Diet. Try nut pods French vanilla dairy-free creamer ($14.20 per pack of 4, buy it here). Be careful of bottled coffee drinks, which may be loaded with carbs. Good, on-the-go option are unsweetened sparkling teas, like Sound and BOS, that are super flavoful without added sugar. Coffee addicts have plenty of options unsweetened options, like RISE.

Can you drink soda on the Keto Diet?

piyato/Getty Images

No, but diet soda is OK on keto in moderation. Unsurprisingly, regular soft drinks are out, as a single 12-ounce can of Pepsi has 41 grams of carbohydrates. If you want to satisfy your soda craving, you’ll have to opt for diet sodas, which use artificial sweeteners. The same serving of Diet Pepsi ($4.99/pack of 12, buy it here) has zero carbs. Those who prefer natural sweeteners may want to check out Zevia, which uses Stevia to create calorie-free versions of cream soda, root beer, and cola ($24.99/24 pack, buy it here).

According to Israetel, the fake sugars won’t knock you out of ketosis. But he does say that artificial sugars, in addition to raising numerous health concerns, may trigger cravings that cause people to eat more. Numerous studies in insects and mice have linked overeating to consumption of synthetic sugars, presumably because the substance triggers cravings for more sugar, Scientific American reported.

Can you drink booze on the Keto Diet?

Getty Images

Not really. Hardcore keto followers may want to avoid happy hour altogether, as alcohol “stops fat loss dead in its tracks,” Israetel says. Drinking alcohol temporarily bumps you out of ketosis, and it’ll also mean that you’ll get drunker faster, so you have to be careful.

Don’t want to give up booze, but still want to burn fat? Beer and wine are high in carbs, so you’ll want to stick to liquor, like vodka or whiskey, and drink it on the rocks. Going out for cocktails will also prove difficult, but you can easily make a low-carb mojito or margarita at home.

Can you drink protein shakes on the keto diet?

Getty Images

Yes. Protein shakes are an easy on-the-go breakfast for keto dieters who can’t just pick up a smoothie. In fact, Israetel says chocolate protein powders make a great addition to coffee if you’re used to picking up a mocha on your way to the office.

Of course, not all protein powders are low in carbohydrates, so you’ll have to check the label. Israetel recommends a powder that contains casein protein, which is digested slowly to help you stay full longer. Or, you could try a protein powder formulated to be nearly carb-free for keto dieters.

One scoop of Perfect Keto protein powder ($37.04, buy it here) has only a single gram of carbs.

Can you drink almond milk on the keto diet?

Laurie CastelliGetty Images

Yes. However, you’ll want to double check the label since some almond milks have added sugars that drive up the carbs. Plain unsweetened almond milk, like this one from Elmhurst, only has three grams of carbs per cup.

Can you drink soy milk on the keto diet?

Kristin LeeGetty Images

Yes! Unsweetened soy milk is a great alternative to traditional milk and won’t eat up your carbs. For example, one cup of regular unsweetened soy milk contains four grams of carbs. However, you’ll want to make sure to purchase unsweetened or flavored varieties as certain options can drive up carb count–and kick you out of ketosis.

Can you drink dairy milk on the keto diet?

Westend61Getty Images

Yes, but you’ll have to be careful of serving size! Be sure to pick whole milk for the higher fat content and measure how much you drink. A single cup of whole milk has almost 12 grams of carbohydrates, which takes up nearly half of some dieters’ daily carb allowance.

Can you drink matcha on the keto diet?

Sitthipong Inthason / EyeEmGetty Images

Yes, and it’s a great for people who miss their favorite sugary Starbucks drinks. Of course, you’ll have to check the label to ensure there’s no added sugar, but many brands offer low-carb mixes. For example, RSP Matcha Bomb only has two grams of carbs per scoop.

Can you drink milkshakes on the keto diet?

AkayArdaGetty Images

Yup! Typically high in fat, milkshakes could be keto-friendly if prepared correctly. You’ll want to use low-carb bases–try mixing unsweetened almond milk and heavy cream. Then, add a tablespoon of nut butter that’s lower in carbohydrates, like FBomb Macadamia & Pecan, which only has four grams of carbohydrates per serving. You can’t add sugar, but stevia drops are a keto-friendly sweetener.

Can you drink smoothies on the keto diet?

Arx0ntGetty Images

Only if you’re super careful about measuring ingredients! You’ll need to pick a low-carb base like unsweetened almond milk, add in a keto-friendly matcha or protein powder, plenty of ice and only a small amount of fruit. Berries have the lowest carbs, and are the safest bet. For example, a half-cup of blueberries comes in at around 10 grams of carbs. Be warned: enjoying a smoothie means you’ll have to skimp on carbs for the rest of your meals and snacks.

Can you drink energy drinks on the keto diet?

Extreme MediaGetty Images

This is another situation where you need to pay attention to labels. Some energy drinks can have upwards of 30 grams of carbs, so you’ll need to choose a sugar-free option, which lowers carb count. Zevia energy drinks are sweetened with Stevia and include no calories.

Melissa Matthews Health Writer Melissa Matthews is the Health Writer at Men’s Health, covering the latest in food, nutrition, and health.

If you’re a shameless Diet Coke aficionado but have also decided to embark on the ever-popular keto diet, you may be feeling torn. The rules for the low-carb, moderate-protein, and high-fat diet, which promises weight-loss results, are extremely strict. But when it comes to diet sodas, the line is a little blurred.

Technically, yes, diet soda is keto. By definition, the keto diet banishes foods and drinks high in carbs or sugar, so the obvious culprits like wine, beer, regular soda, and juice are out. But since diet sodas have no sugar and no calories, they pass the test. However, it doesn’t take a dietitian to know that diet sodas are made with artificial sweeteners and fillers, and research has proven that side effects of diet soda can include mood alterations, weight gain, and increased risk of a heart attack.

So if you want to be as natural as possible while pursuing your keto clean-eating plan, you’ll want to avoid sodas — both regular and diet. But you can have piece of mind knowing that cracking a bubbly diet beverage open once in a blue moon won’t sabotage your keto goals. The keto diet does allow you to have bacon and cheeses like brie and mozzarella, but sometimes you’ve got a soda craving that’s hard to ignore.

You can also opt to get on board with the sparkling beverage trend and satisfy soda cravings with carbonated waters and teas. The keto diet is not for everyone, soda preferences aside, so be sure to approach it carefully, and consult your doctor if you have concerns.

Image Source: Flickr user Beau B

The Ultimate Keto Alcohol Guide

Alcohol on a Low Carb Diet!

Alcohol gets a bad rep, and is certainly one of the most abused substances in the world. It can become a serious problem when it interferes with your personal/social life and well-being. To enjoy it we need to exercise moderation and self-control.

If you like having a couple of beers, shots, or glasses of wine to relax or have a good time on weekends, you’re in good shape! But throw a low carb diet into the mix, and you may find yourself struggling with the quantity of alcohol you’re drinking. People on a keto or low carb diet notice their tolerances significantly drop. And when you realize your favorite drink contains more than 30 grams of carbs in a small serving, you may consider giving alcohol up.

Before you give it up, use our Ultimate Keto Alcohol Guide and our Keto Cocktails in Five recipes to help navigate your way through your local bar, easily make your own classic keto-fied cocktails and become a keto connoisseur.

How and Why Alcohol Affects Us

“…alcohol molecules slow down signals from the brain for actions such as walking and talking” Alcohol is actually the fourth macronutrient, providing our body with 7 calories per gram. If you aren’t familiar with macronutrients, you can read more about macronutrients here. Since alcohol is not needed for survival and is considered toxic to humans, it’s ignored under this umbrella of essential macronutrients.

When we ingest alcohol (in the form of ethanol), our body begins to work to metabolize it or destroy/break it down to get energy. Since alcohol is toxic to our bodies, we begin to metabolize it as soon as possible. The tipsy feeling we get is the alcohol being metabolized. Since alcohol molecules are water and fat soluble, they’re able to pass through and be delivered to pretty much all parts of our body, most importantly, our brain and liver. About 98% of the alcohol we consume is processed in the liver; the rest is excreted through urine, sweat and even breathing!

Some symptoms of being drunk like slurred speech, impaired judgment and poor gross motor movement is caused by the alcohol molecules slowing down signals from the brain for actions such as walking and talking. For this reason, it’s classified as a depressant, as it slows down our bodily functions – fat burning being one of them.

The Science of Fat Burning and Alcohol Metabolization

Many people find that drinking alcohol in excess stalls their weight loss. That may be because the liver will begin to process the alcohol as soon as possible. Our fat burning processes are disrupted to rid ourselves of that alcohol quickly. The speed at which alcohol is metabolized differs from person to person.

The liver of a person on a high carbohydrate diet has a lot of glycogen stored. Glycogen is a by-product of glucose (sugar and carbs) and is the secondary long-term energy storage, with the primary energy stores being the fat cells held in adipose tissue. If you are eating a carbohydrate-rich diet, the pathways for fat burning are busy breaking down sugars; the alcohol is metabolized slower because of this hold up. Conversely, a person on a low carb diet has depleted their liver’s glycogen stores and is now running on fats instead of carbs and glucose, and burning body fat more efficiently. Since their glycogen stores are low, the alcohol ingested will start to be metabolized by the liver right away.

This immediate metabolization will cause that sudden onset on feeling drunk. Your liver isn’t going to warn you when that alcohol has arrived for processing. Many keto-ers will experience lowered tolerance simply because their liver is ready to metabolize efficiently instead of feeling sluggish processing extra carbs and sugars.

Other Issues with Drinking and Fat Loss

Besides the science behind our metabolic processes, we’ve also got some humanistic flaws.

When we ingest alcohol, our inhibitions are lowered, which can make mindless snacking and cheating on your diet much more likely to happen.

On a ketogenic diet, you’ll notice you are hungry less because of the slowly released energy from fats. If you start drinking alcohol on a relatively empty stomach, you will start to feel the effects of alcohol much faster (again, having to do with glycogen stores and being in a fasted state).

Speaking of a fasted state, a great way to deplete glycogen stores is by intermittent fasting. This technique allows your body to enter ketosis much faster, as the primary source of energy is fat and not carbs. Your body is forced to use up its glycogen stores faster, run out, and move on to the fats you’re feeding it.

Lastly, just as with any diet, alcohol consumption should be limited. Alcohol calories are empty calories. They provide our body will small amounts of energy but are short-lived. We also don’t absorb any nutrients, vitamins or minerals from alcohol. It’s best to keep alcohol a treat and enjoy in moderation.

So What Alcohol Can We Enjoy?

Clear liquors at about 40% alcohol are a safe bet and are considered keto alcohol, and anything that tastes sweet is not! Acceptable keto alcohol includes:

  • Vodka
  • Tequila
  • Gin
  • Whiskey
  • Rum
  • Scotch
  • Brandy
  • Cognac

Low Carb / Keto Friendly Wines

You can also still enjoy wine and beer! However, you need to learn which wines are keto friendly and how many carbs are in your wine of choice. Here are a few low carb wines to explore! Stick to dry or semi-dry wines; you’ll develop the taste for them if you haven’t already. The calorie and carb counts will differ depending on brand, types of grapes/growing conditions and process of fermentation, but an average is provided:

Red Wines (5 oz. serving)

White Wines (5 oz. serving)

  • Pinot Grigio: 122 calories, 3.2 carbs
  • Sauvignon Blanc: 122 calories, 2.7 carbs
  • Chardonnay: 118 calories, 3.7 carbs
  • Riesling: 118 calories, 5.5 carbs
  • Champagne (although low in alcohol content, so you’d need to drink more): 96 calories, 1.5 carbs

Low Carb / Keto Friendly Beer

Just like with wine, there are many low carb beer options to choose from. Here are a few good options to consider:

Light Beers (12 oz. serving)

  • Bud Select 55: 55 calories, 1.9 carbs
  • MGD 64: 64 calories, 2.4 carbs
  • Rolling Rock Green Light: 92 calories, 2.4 carbs
  • Michelob Ultra: 95 calories, 2.6 carbs
  • Bud Select: 99 calories, 3.1 carbs
  • Miller Lite: 96 calories, 3.2 carbs
  • Natural Light: 95 calories, 3.2 carbs
  • Michelob Ultra Amber: 114 calories, 3.7 carbs
  • Coors Light: 102 calories, 5 carbs
  • Amstel Light: 95 calories, 5 carbs
  • Bud Light: 110 calories, 6.6 carbs

What To Watch Out For

Sugar is hidden everywhere! Even something seemingly innocent like a gin and tonic can have over 30g of carbs- tonic water is very high in sugar. If the bartender adds artificial lime juice and simple syrup, you’re probably well over 50g of sugar in one glass. Avoid the following popular drinks and mix-ins, and you’ll be a low carb pro in no time.

Sweet Wines

  • Moscato
  • Port/Sherry
  • Dessert Wines
  • Sangria
  • Zinfandel

Sugary Mixers

  • Triplesec
  • Whiskey sour mix
  • Blue curaçao
  • Sugary syrups
  • Grenadine
  • Frozen margarita mixes

Avoid Wine Coolers & Alcopops

Wine coolers and Alcopops are essentially the same as sugary sodas with some alcohol added. These should be avoided at all costs simply because of the massive sugar content. A good example of just how many carbs we’re talking about is Smirnoff Ice, which contains 32g of carbs per 12oz. serving. That’s almost as many carbs as Coca-Cola (39g carbs per 12oz serving)!

Need to Chase? You’re Not Alone.

Alcohol isn’t dessert. Most people need to chase or mix their spirits to make them go down easier. Some good chasers/mixers you can safely enjoy are:

  • Seltzer water
  • Flavored seltzer water
  • Diet tonic water
  • Diet flavored bubbly water
  • Stir in some Stevia, or erythritol if you’re drinking at home!
  • Zero-sugar drinks (e.g. Redbull Sugar-free, Bai5 sweetened with erythritol, Diet Soda, Monster)
  • Stur (no aspartame!)
  • Mio Water Enhancement

Our favorite drink to order (and make ourselves) is the Raspberry Lime Rickey, made with gin, sugar-free raspberry syrup and limes.

Hungover? Why and How to Help

Simply put, the state of being hungover is caused by DEHYDRATION. The fix? DRINK MORE WATER.

While drinking alcohol, DRINK WATER. Got home safe and going to sleep? DRINK WATER. Wake up feeling icky? DRINK WATER. Water will cure and prevent hangovers better than any spicy, gingery, supplement, raw egg tonic anyone can try to sell to you. The answer is water. Between drinks at the club or bar, down a cup of water. Do this a few times and it will help immensely. Avoid that nausea, headache, fatigue, and misery with this easy fix.

The best hangover cure is lots of water, some aspirin to speed up recovery and a good lounge on the couch. Chill and recover. Rinse and repeat.

Sources

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8116538

You’ll Love Our Keto in Five Cookbooks!

We believe that the key to success is simplicity and satisfaction with your diet. That’s why we created our Keto in Five ecookbook series which includes Breakfast in Five, Lunch in Five, Dinner in Five & Dessert in Five.

Each ebook contains 30 recipes. Every recipe is made with just 5 ingredients and has up to 5 grams of net carbs. That means you can have seconds of any meal and you’ll still be within your daily carb limit!

Carbs in alcohol 

Do you know how many drinks you have each week? You need to be completely honest with yourself, and if even the thought of cutting back on alcohol is frightening, you need to get serious about how much and how often you drink.

I know plenty of people that could not entertain the idea of having a night with friends without excessive alcohol yet they complain they can’t lose weight or have medical problems that are associated with alcohol use.

They would never associate the two but make no mistake, excessive alcohol is damaging. It is linked to cancer (especially breast, liver and colon), weight gain, alcoholic liver disease, anaemia and heart disease.

How alcohol affects our body

The health concerns (don’t underestimate these)

  • Alcohol will always be metabolised before anything else in the liver because it is a toxin.
  • Alcohol is not your friend if you are trying to lose belly fat.
  • You may be able to drink in moderation but make no mistake, it will stop weight loss and even cause weight gain.
  • If you want to break through a weight loss plateau, stop alcohol completely until you see the results you want.
  • Alcohol lowers your self-control when it comes to eating healthy foods.
  • Drinking alcohol will increase your cravings and appetite (you get the ‘munchies’).
  • Alcohol can cause fatty liver disease.

The health benefits (don’t overestimate these)

  • Alcohol may be good for heart health, but only if consumed in moderation (otherwise it may adversely affect heart health).
  • Red wine can be a great source of resveratrol, an antioxidant. But not in excess.
  • Alcohol is a relaxant.

“Beer is liquid bread”

Image credit :: Diet Doctor, carbs in alcohol. Used with permission

Beer is made from grains (oats, barley, wheat, rye), malt (sugar) and yeast. They don’t call a big gut a “beer belly” for nothing. Beer was originally brewed to provide nourishment for adults and children alike, especially during periods of fasting. So next time you order a beer, ponder for a moment on whether you are actually ordering a liquid meal.

Don’t confuse low carb beer with low alcohol beer. Many perceive them as healthier so consume more of them.

Cider – let’s call it what it is – SUGAR SUGAR SUGAR

Cider is fermented apple juice, many are incredibly sweet. Cider varies considerably from brand to brand. Let’s take a look at a few examples. Each is per 12 fl oz serving Amber 28g, Bittersweet barrels aged, 21g, Granny Smith 11g, Harpoon 10g, Woodchuck summer cider 25g

Spirits, liqueurs and mixers – the good, the bad and the ugly

Sweet liqueurs, stop buying them – amaretto 17g, Baileys 7.4g, Blue curaçao 7g, Cointreau 7g, Creme de menthe 22g, Jaegermeister 27g, Kailua 15g, Peach Schnapps 8g, Samba 18g. carbs per 1 oz/37ml serving.

Spirits can be a great low carb alcohol choice, most are zero carb. What you mix them with can be the problem. Whisky on the rocks is a good low carb option but rum and coke (or even worse, Red Bull) is probably the worst choice you can make.

Cocktails can be a total disaster. They are mixed with sugar syrups, high sugar juice or soda, and high sugar liqueurs. Make your own so you know what went into the cocktail or limit yourself to just one then swap onto a lower carb option.

Why not mix your usual spirit with water, diet drinks or soda water? Instead of a single shot in a small tumbler, ask for a single shot in a tall glass so it will last longer through the night. And why not try alternating an alcoholic drink with just the mixer?

Wine can be a great option – just not the sweet ones

Avoid the sweet wines and the sticky dessert wines, instead, choose the dry wines and the less sweet varieties.

Red wines – Cabernet sauvignon 3.8g, Merlot 3.7g, Pinot noir 3.4g, Shiraz Syrah 3.8g Zinfandel 4.2g per 5 fl oz/147ml glass

White wines – Chardonnay 3.2g, Dessert wines 20.2g, Muscat 7.8g, Riesling 5.5g, Sauvignon blanc 3g per 5 fl oz/147ml glass

All values were obtained from the USDA database or MyFitnessPal.

Take a look at the entire series of Ultimate Guides

  • Ultimate Guide To Carbs In Food 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 lists
  • Carbs In Vegetables
  • Carbs In Fruit
  • What Are Healthy Fats
  • Low Carb Sweeteners
  • Low Carb Flours
  • Guide To Carbs In Beige Food
  • Coconut Flour vs Almond Flour
  • Carbs In Nuts And Seeds
  • Carbs In Sauces

Why Am I Alcohol-Free For 2019

I am currently alcohol-free for 2019, apart from two special days in the calendar where I will savour every single sip from a single glass.

The more I read about the toxicity of alcohol and the role it plays in many disease states has lead me to cut back dramatically on my alcohol consumption, to the point where I wanted to be alcohol-free for an entire year.

It was a purely personal and individual choice, but the more I read, there is no getting away from it, alcohol is a toxin and I want to live the healthiest life I can. Yes, there is much debate to whether 1-2 glasses a night or a week is beneficial, but for me, I wanted to see if I could do it. It was a personal challenge.

I feel fabulous, no more foggy mornings, no more lethargy after a few too many the previous night. I thought I was energetic when I started living low-carb but the energy and clarity now are unbelievable.

It hasn’t hindered me in any way in social situations, but what was surprised by has been the reaction from others fell into either 1) well done, I couldn’t do it but awesome you are trying it for a year OR 2) oh for goodness sake, what on earth is there left?

It has been interesting to understand these reactions. I am very private and only tell them that I am alcohol-free if I’m asked. I did not declare it publicly. I am not judging anyone and I am not asking anyone to join me. In fact, I often feel I am being judged then often scorned.

Maybe I will write a post on my experiences living alcohol-free year, probably not. Have you gone alcohol-free? What has been your experience?

About the author

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *