Albuterol inhaler side effect

Contents

Tips & Advice Center: General Nebulizer Information

What is a Nebulizer? >>
How Do I Use a Nebulizer? >>
How Do I Set Up a Nebulizer? >>
Proper Use of Your Nebulizer >>
Know Your Nebulizer Parts >>
Guide to Nebulizer Accessories >>
Medications Used with Nebulizers >>
Nebulizers and Caregivers >>
Choosing a Nebulizer: Tabletop or Portable? >>
Buying a Nebulizer, Parts, and Accessories >>
How Do I Shop for a Nebulizer? >>
Disposable Nebulizer Sets >>
How to Choose a Nebulizer >>
Replacing Your Nebulizer >>
Nebulizers, Accessories, and Price >>
Shopping Smart for Nebulizer Accessories >>
Tips for Fast and Easy Nebulizer Treatments >>
Nebulizer Types >>
Top 10 Nebulizer Terms >>
Best Nebulizer Handheld Set >>

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What is a Nebulizer?

A nebulizer is a breathing machine used to treat lung conditions such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, and other respiratory illnesses. They administer medication in the form of a mist that’s inhaled into the lungs and are often used in situations in which using an inhaler is difficult or ineffective. Nebulizers are also used to limit the side effects of medications like steroids by delivering the medicine directly to the respiratory system.

There are two types of nebulizers: atomizer jet and ultrasonic. The atomizer, or “compressor nebulizer,” is the most common. This type uses an aerosol compressor to vaporize droplets of medicine. Ultrasonic, or “mesh nebulizers,” use high-frequency sound waves to make liquid medicine breathable. While ultrasonic models produce results comparable to jet nebulizers, they offer faster delivery of medication and operate more quietly. With both types of nebulizer, the patient inhales vapor through a mouthpiece or face mask.

There are a variety of nebulizers on the market, ranging in price from $50 to around $200. Both the jet and ultrasonic nebulizer systems come in tabletop or portable models and a variety of accessories and supplies are available for each. Tabletop nebulizers are intended for home use, as they need to be plugged into an electrical outlet. Portable units are battery-powered and small enough to fit into a bag or purse for travel; however, they tend to be more expensive and require disposable or rechargeable batteries or a car power adapter to run.

Consult your healthcare provider to find the appropriate unit for your needs.

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How do I Use a Nebulizer?

Successful nebulizer treatment depends on proper use and care of your nebulizer unit. Here are some instructions on using your nebulizer:

  • Allow enough time in your schedule for each treatment. Depending on your nebulizer, you may be spending between 5 and 15 minutes receiving treatment.
  • Make sure your unit, supplies, medications, and accessories are clean and ready to use.
  • Get comfortable—you’ll be spending your treatment time in one place, so make sure you have what you need. Feel free to watch TV, listen to music, read, or just relax during the process. It’s recommended that you sit up straight to ensure proper delivery of medicine.
  • Place the mouthpiece between your teeth and seal your mouth around it, or, if you’re using a mask, put it on so that it’s secure on the face with no gaps.
  • Switch on the power and take slow, deep breaths from the mouthpiece or mask. Hold each breath for two to three seconds before exhaling.
  • Treatment should continue until the medicine has been used.
  • Sometimes, patients feel dizzy or strange during treatment. If this happens, remove the mask or mouthpiece, turn off the machine, and rest for 5 minutes before beginning again, then breathe slowly.
  • When the treatment is finished, switch off the power, breathe deeply several times, and cough to clear secretions. Spit them into a tissue or basin.
  • Wash hands thoroughly.
  • Finally, check your nebulizer supplies and accessories to make sure you’ll be ready for the next treatment.

If you experience continuing symptoms like dizziness or agitation, seek medical attention. Contact your healthcare provider to learn more about nebulizers.

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How Do I Set Up a Nebulizer?

Follow these instructions for using standard nebulizers such as Mini Comp, CompMist, PARI, Omron, PulmoMate, Invacare, and DeVilbiss models:

  • Identify the components and accessories of the nebulizer unit. You should have an air compressor, medication cup, mask or mouthpiece, tubing, and measuring device (medication ampule, syringe, etc.).
  • Place your nebulizer (air compressor unit) on a table or stable surface.
  • Plug in the electrical cord.
  • Make sure all accessories and components have been cleaned and dried according to instructions.
  • Wash hands thoroughly.
  • Measure medication with the suggested measuring instrument, according to instructions.
  • Open the top of the nebulizer cup and dispense the medicine in front of the cup. Close the cup.
  • Attach the cup to the mouthpiece or face mask and connect the tubing to the compressor and the cup.
  • Switch the compressor on and get ready for treatment.

Every nebulizer comes with specific instructions. Refer to these instructions before using for the first time.

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Proper Use of Your Nebulizer

To get the best results from treatment, it’s crucial to get information on proper nebulizer use and care before you begin. Keeping your nebulizer in working order will help to ensure successful treatment and minimize symptoms.

Here are some mistakes commonly made in nebulizer use:

  • Using a type of nebulizer or medication that is not recommended by your healthcare provider.
  • Using a nebulizer only upon the emergence of symptoms.
  • Not knowing the proper assembly and operating instructions for a nebulizer.
  • Not changing the filters, nebulizer cups, and tubing on a regular basis.
  • Measuring medication improperly.
  • For small children, attempting to use a nebulizer that isn’t child-friendly.

Knowing common mistakes will help prevent misuse and minimized treatment. Contact your healthcare provider or contact the experts at Just Nebulizers for more information about the proper use and care of your nebulizer.

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Know Your Nebulizer Parts

There are lots of models of nebulizer out there, and each one is a little different from the others. This general guide to nebulizer parts will give you a basic idea of what makes a nebulizer system function.

  • Nebulizer compressor: The compressor is the base of the system. It pumps air into the medication cup to create a breathable mist.
  • Nebulizer cup: This is the reservoir where measured liquid medication goes.
  • Mouthpiece/mask: This is the opening through which the mist is inhaled. Most nebulizer sets come with mouthpieces, but masks are available for those who find them more comfortable or who have trouble wrapping their lips around the mouthpiece.
  • Tubing: The tubing delivers air from the compressor to the medication cup.
  • Tubing connectors: These connect the tubing to the compressor and nebulizer cup.

All manufacturers provide specific information about the nebulizers they make, so check your user’s manual to learn more about your model. Also, check with your manufacturer for warranty and replacement information.

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Guide to Nebulizer Accessories

If you’re new to using a nebulizer, here is a quick guide to nebulizer accessories:

  • Nebulizer mask: A nebulizer mask fits over the mouth and nose to deliver medication directly to the airways. Nebulizer treatments require a mask or mouthpiece. Masks come in different sizes, and most can be purchased for about $5.
  • Nebulizer filters: These should be changed regularly in order to ensure the air you’re breathing in is clean and that normal air contaminates do not get into your nebulizers. Make sure to purchase a filter that’s compatible with your nebulizer. Using your nebulizer without the proper, clean air filter will cause normal air particles and contaminates to ruin your compressor. Many are available in multi-packs that cost between $5 and $10.
  • Rechargeable nebulizer battery pack: If you have a portable nebulizer, a battery pack will ensure that your nebulizer is ready for use at all times.
  • Replacement power adapter: Tabletop nebulizers need to be plugged in order to function.
  • Carrying case: A carrying case helps protect your investment and makes traveling with a nebulizer more convenient. Many have pockets to hold smaller parts like masks and mouthpieces.

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Medications Used with Nebulizers

There are different types of prescription asthma medications that can be used with an aerosol compressor (or nebulizer). These include:

  • Quick-relief medications that are used to reduce airway inflammation, bronchial swelling, and overproduction of mucus.
  • Long-term control medications that help manage symptoms on a daily basis.

Quick-relief medications such as albuterol will help relieve sudden asthma symptoms. They typically begin working 5 to 15 minutes after treatment and can usually be administered every 3 to 4 hours, depending on your healthcare provider’s instructions.

Preventative medicines like steroids and mast-cell inhibitors help manage symptoms to keep flare-ups at bay. A bronchodilator can be used to improve airflow. Steroids (corticosteroids) are taken once or twice daily and work to control inflammation, and mast-cell inhibitors decrease inflammation.

Some medications are only compatible with certain types of nebulizers. Your healthcare provider will tell you which type will work with your medication.

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Nebulizers and Caregivers

If your child or loved one requires breathing treatments and requires the help of a caregiver, it’s important that any caregivers, school nurses, home health aids, or teachers who might administer treatment understand how to properly use a nebulizer. Also, there are steps you can take to make the process a little less nerve-racking.

  • Try to arrange to demonstrate a complete nebulizer treatment for anyone who might administer treatment.
  • Type up specific instructions for after-treatment nebulizer cleaning and leave several copies with caregivers. If you’re worried that the nebulizer might not be cleaned properly, purchase disposable nebulizers. Also, include instructions for proper medication measurement.
  • If your nebulizer system didn’t come with one, purchase a carrying case to make storage easy and to ensure that all parts remain in one place.
  • Consider purchasing a small, portable nebulizer for away-from-home treatments. The Omron Micro-Air Electronic Nebulizer System, for example, is cordless and tubeless, and fewer parts and pieces could reduce the chances of misuse or loss.
  • Caregivers who are new to nebulizers might not be able to recognize when parts or accessories need to be replaced. Keep a chart to help you remember when it’s time to reorder and replace.

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Choosing a Nebulizer: Tabletop or Portable?

If you’re wondering which type of nebulizer you should buy to treat your asthma or respiratory condition, start by talking to your healthcare provider. If you’re able to choose between portable and tabletop models, consider your needs and the advantages of both.

Buy a tabletop nebulizer compressor for home if:

  • You’re able to be at home for all of your treatments.
  • You prefer a more affordable nebulizer system.
  • You would rather not worry about recharging batteries.

Buy a portable nebulizer if:

  • You have a busy lifestyle and may not always be able to make it home for nebulizer treatments.
  • You like to travel.
  • You’d prefer a smaller model that’s easy to carry with you.

Some people prefer to purchase both types of nebulizers for convenience. If you’re unsure of which type to purchase, it might be best to go with portable models, as they offer greater versatility. For further advice, feel free to contact us

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Buying a Nebulizer, Parts, and Accessories

If you’re purchasing a nebulizer for the first time, the multitude of models, brands, accessories, and suppliers makes it difficult to know where to begin. Consider the following nebulizer buying guide to keep from feeling overwhelmed:

  • Your healthcare provider may be specific about the type of nebulizer you need. If not, ask him or her about the type of machine that is best for your health. Certain medications work best with specific types of nebulizers, and some medications have limitations for which nebulizers they can be used with.
  • Find out what types of nebulizer accessories you need. Is the nebulizer for a child who needs a special mask or mouthpiece? Or do you need an adult nebulizer mask? Find a retailer that carries a full line of these products.
  • Consider your lifestyle. If you travel, work, or attend school, portable nebulizers may work best for you since they’re battery-operated and easy to carry. You may find that a combination of a home tabletop nebulizer and a portable unit suits your lifestyle. Buy from a retailer that offers both.
  • Just Nebulizers carries a full line of nebulizers and accessories, offers secure checkout, and has helpful customer service that can assist you with product warranties and the equipment itself.

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How Do I Shop For a Nebulizer?

Once your healthcare provider has recommended a nebulizer for your medication administration, you have the opportunity to choose the one best suited to your needs.

Though these needs are dictated by medical treatment, you may still have choices when it comes to brand, size, and other options. There are many suppliers of compressor nebulizers, breathing machines, and aerosol compressors, so it can be hard to choose where to shop. Follow these simple shopping tips:

  • Look for a reputable dealer that carries a variety of brands, models, and accessories.
  • If you’re shopping for a children’s nebulizer, look for a full selection to find one that appeals to your child. If you would prefer a versatile model, try a PARI nebulizer, which can be used with optional, kid-friendly accessories.
  • Consider purchasing a convenient travel nebulizer for use when you’re away from home in addition to a home tabletop unit.
  • Compressor nebulizers are less expensive than other models, but they’re also noisier than other units. Consider your comfort when making a selection.
  • Decide whether you would rather have a disposable mouthpiece kit or one that will last longer. Disposable mouthpiece kits are non-valved, meaning they do not have a reservoir for medicine. Non-valved kits do not deliver medicine as effectively as longer-lasting units.
  • Make sure the nebulizer you choose comes with a manufacturer’s warranty, operating instructions, and all advertised components.
  • Look for professional advertising, a full-service web page, customer satisfaction reviews, and a knowledgeable customer service team that can assist you.

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Disposable Nebulizer Sets

For safety and convenience, disposable nebulizer sets are available. While reusable models can be used for longer (up to 6 months), disposable sets can make performing breathing treatments easier in some situations.

  • Disposable nebulizer sets are commonly used by hospitals and emergency rooms due to patient volume. They’re also often used in doctor’s offices; in fact, many doctors send their patients home with the sets used in-office. If your doctor provides you with a nebulizer set, make sure to ask if it’s disposable.
  • Many models, such as the Sidestream High-Efficiency Nebulizer Set and the MICRO MIST Nebulizer Set, come with tubing, so all you need is a compressor to hook the nebulizer set into.
  • Disposable nebulizer sets are great for travel. If you’re not sure whether or not you’ll have access to a good place to clean your nebulizer set after treatment while you’re away, you can bring along some disposables to use with a portable compressor and throw them away after use. Priced at around $7 each, this is an affordable travel solution that will help ensure your safety.
  • They’re great for your child’s overnight trips. Keep the reusable nebulizer set at home and send him or her to Grandma’s house with a portable compressor and disposable nebulizer sets. This way, they can spend less time worrying about cleaning and more time having fun together. Also, you’ll feel assured that your child is receiving hygienic treatment.

Most disposable nebulizer sets can be used for up to two weeks. This may vary, so read the manufacturer’s instructions before use.

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How to Choose a Nebulizer

A nebulizer is an investment in your health and wellness, and choosing a unit that fits your lifestyle and medical needs requires a lot of thought. When making your decision, keep these tips in mind:

  • Talk to your healthcare professional about your symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment plan. If a nebulizer is the right treatment for you, find out what types of medicines will be prescribed and how often you will be using the nebulizer.
  • Know where and when you will use the nebulizer. Depending on your lifestyle, you may need to purchase a unit for home use and a portable model for work, school, or travel. Battery-powered units like the PARI Trek S or Omron Micro Air are great for those who are on-the-go.
  • Time constraints can play a role in your nebulizer selection. An ultrasonic unit will take less time per treatment than a compressor nebulizer (5 minutes rather than the average 15), and it will deliver 100% of the liquid medication you dispense, maximizing treatment and freeing your time for other activities. (Note: not all medications are approved for use with ultrasonic nebulizers. Check with your healthcare provider for compatibility information).
  • If your child requires nebulizer treatment, shop for child-friendly models. A nebulizer can be intimidating for small children, but purchasing a model with cartoon characters or a fun theme will help make breathing treatments enjoyable and relaxing. One of the most efficient units on the market, the PARI Vios, is available in a version made just for children. Both units function the same way, but the color and accessories of the PARI nebulizer for children will help your child feel more comfortable during treatment.

Still not sure? For expert advice, call or email the team at Just Nebulizers.

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Replacing Your Nebulizer

If you use a nebulizer to manage your asthma or another medical condition, you might be wondering when you’ll need to replace your compressor or other components. Nebulizers last longer when properly cared for, and proper care involves checking the air filter frequently and changing it when necessary. Because a dirty air filter makes the compressor work harder, keeping it clean will extend the life of your machine.

Keeping your breathing machine clean is also important to ensure proper treatment and hygiene. Dust and particle build-up on your nebulizer and accessories can cause your machine to fail. Most systems should be replaced at least every 5 years. Making sure your nebulizer components are cleaned according to instructions will promote effective treatment and prevent the spread of germs.

While changing your air filter and cleaning your system properly are extremely important, plastic components do break down over time, and your nebulizer may eventually fail. When it comes time to replace your nebulizer system, choose one that will work with your specific medication (for example, the medication Pulmicort should not be used with ultrasonic nebulizers). Check with your healthcare provider or call us if you have questions about this.

If you haven’t shopped for nebulizers lately, you might be surprised at the large selection of nebulizers, components, and supplies currently on the market. Choose from tabletop, portable, jet, mesh, and ultrasonic models. These units will help you save time and will make your treatment more effective.

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Nebulizers, Accessories, and Price

If your doctor has prescribed a nebulizer system for you and you’re concerned about the expense, there are some ways to cut down on costs and some things that are worth a little extra investment. Before purchasing, consult this quick guide to help you make the most of your money:

  • It’s important to buy high-quality nebulizers and accessories. This is an investment in your health, and a machine of lower quality might not be as effective.
  • Most nebulizer systems come with the compressor, nebulizer set (which includes the tubing and mouthpiece), and medication cup. Some also come with masks and/or air filters. These items will eventually need replacement, but purchasing a system that’s complete will save you from having to spend additional money right away.
  • Nebulizers and accessories tend to be less expensive online than in stores. When purchasing online, try to order all the accessories you need at once. This way, you’ll always have supplies on hand when you need them, and you’ll also save money on shipping by having everything sent to you at one time.
  • Replacing accessories and filters on time will help make your nebulizer system last longer, which saves you money in the long run. Nebulizer filters are not washable, so make sure to stock up on replacements. If you use disposable nebulizer sets, these also need to be replaced periodically (most models will last for up to two weeks–always check the manufacturer’s instructions to make sure). Reusable nebulizer sets can be replaced less frequently.
  • Look for special prices and shipping promotions. Just Nebulizers periodically offers reduced prices on popular nebulizers and accessories and sometimes offers free shipping.

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Shopping Smart for Nebulizer Accessories

If you want to shop smart for nebulizer accessories, follow these tips:

  • Replace any accessories that are worn, bent, discolored, or cracked.
  • Keep extra accessories and parts on-hand, just in case.
  • Many nebulizer parts and accessories are compatible and interchangeable, but you may want to stick to the original brand for continuity.
  • If you like mixing brands, look for sales on the specific items you need.
  • Know what you’re buying. For example, nebulizer masks come in a variety of sizes. You’ll need to find out what size you need to replace before placing an order. Also, know what types of filters, medication cups, and parts you need for your specific nebulizer.
  • Keep records that list your nebulizer manufacturer and your system’s model number. You may need this information when shopping for replacement parts.
  • Only change the basic operating system after talking to your doctor. Some medications require a specific type of nebulizer in order to be effective.
  • Take advantage of your supplier’s customer service department. They can answer product-related questions for you and update you on relevant discounts and sales.
  • Look for reliable retailers like Just Nebulizers that carry a full line of products to meet your needs.

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Tips for Fast and Easy Nebulizer Treatments

Nebulizer treatments can become a daily chore, but with a few easy changes, you can speed up your treatment time and be on your way faster. Here are a few things you can do to decrease your treatment time:

  • Check to make sure your filter is clean. A dirty filter will put unneeded strain on your compressor and can slow down your treatment.
  • Be sure you nebulizer set is new. Disposable sets, which come with most compressors, are only meant to last up to 10 treatments. Reusable nebulizer sets can last up to 6 months. Be sure you keep your nebulizer set fresh and new.
  • Get a breath enhanced reusable nebulizer set like the PARI LC Plus. It works by speeding up the treatment when you inhale, providing a better treatment, lower medication waste, and a faster treatment. Not only will your treatment be faster, but clean-up is a breeze because the PARI LC nebulizer sets are dishwasher safe.
  • Consider getting a portable nebulizer so you can take your treatments in the car or on-the-go. Our most popular nebulizer is the Omron MicroAir which has an average treatment time of 10 minutes. It runs off AA batteries and is completely silent so you can take a treatment anywhere – even in a movie theater, and no one will know.

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Nebulizer Types

There are three main types of nebulizer systems. The first and most popular is the compressor nebulizer. It is also known as a jet nebulizer and works by forcing compressed air into the medication cup to aerosolize the medication. This is the type of nebulizer most medical facilities use. A very popular type of compressor nebulizer is the PARI Vios.

The second type of nebulizer system is an ultrasonic nebulizer system. It works by vibrating the medication into an aerosol. It operates easily and silently, although it does have a few medication restrictions because it adds heat to the medications. Check with your healthcare provider before purchasing this type of nebulizer.

A subcategory of ultrasonic nebulizers is an electronic nebulizer. It works by vibrating a mesh or membrane to create an aerosol. Unlike an ultrasonic, it does not add heat to the solution so it does not have the same medication restrictions. Electronic nebulizers tend to be slightly more expensive than the other types. The most popular type of electronic nebulizer is the Omron MicroAir.

One other nebulizer, often categorized separately, is the portable or travel nebulizer. These can be compressor or ultrasonic nebulizer systems and generally are characterized by their ability to operate away from a traditional wall outlet – either by battery or car adapter. These are popular for people who are on the go and can even replace a standard tabletop unit.

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Top 10 Nebulizer Terms

Here is a list of 10 common terms you will want to be familiar with when purchasing a nebulizer.

  1. Accessories – accessories are any item that is not standard on the nebulizer system. These can include masks, mouthpiece attachments, pacifiers, additional power sources, additional nebulizers, etc.
  2. Aerosol – medication vaper you can inhale.
  3. Compressor – this is the machine that pumps air into the nebulizer. It is often referred to as the nebulizer, but it is only responsible for compressing the air.
  4. Electronic nebulizer – these use a vibrating mesh or membrane to create an aerosol.
  5. Jet nebulizer – another name for a compressor nebulizer system.
  6. Medicine cup – the medicine cup is where the medication is poured prior to treatment. It houses liquid medicine before it can be aerosolized.
  7. Nebulizer – the handset that actually produces the aerosol. This is the part that actually does the work. It is connected to the compressor and the medication is aerosolized in it.
  8. Nebulizer tubing – most compressor nebulizers use tubing to connect the nebulizer to the compressor. The standard length for nebulizer tubing is 7 feet.
  9. Particle size – the size of the aerosol particles. The ideal range if 5-10 microns. Anything larger or smaller will not help in most treatments.
  10. Ultrasonic nebulizer – rather than using compressed air, this kind of nebulizer uses ultrasonic waves to aerosolize the medication. Usually smaller and more quiet than compressor nebulizers.

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Best Nebulizer Handheld Set

Like many other things, nebulizer technology is getting better and more compact. It makes it much easier for you to breathe easily when you can keep handheld sets close by at all times so you can quickly connect them to your portable compressor.

Among the handheld nebulizer set options, three models standout. The PARI LC Sprint is one of the most popular nebulizer sets on the market. It is inexpensive yet reusable. It offers one of the shortest treatment times on the market because of the breath enhanced technology which causes the medication delivery to speed up when the user inhales and slow down when they exhale. It also reduces the medication waste. The set is very low maintenance and can even be washed in the dishwasher. Like any reusable nebulizer, it should be replaced every six months.

The Sidestream Plus Breath-Enhanced Nebulizer is also an inexpensive reusable nebulizer set. This unit has a five-jet venture design, again speeding up the treatment time. The Sidestream Plus is good for those who have low breath flow because it requires less pressure to open the valve than many other breath enhanced nebulizers.

One of the lowest cost options you can get is the MicroMist nebulizer set. This disposable, handheld set comes with mouthpiece, T and tubing. It can also be purchased with a 6” corrugated tube and is compatible with any standard compressor you choose. While the MicroMist has the lowest upfront cost, it must be replaced much more frequently and is often a more costly option for those who use nebulizers often. It also is not dishwasher safe and must be soaked in vinegar and water to disinfect, making it less convenient than other models which can be placed in the dishwasher.

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Proair

SIDE EFFECTS

Use of PROAIR HFA may be associated with the following:

  • Paradoxical bronchospasm
  • Cardiovascular Effects
  • Immediate hypersensitivity reactions
  • Hypokalemia

Clinical Trials Experience

A total of 1090 subjects were treated with PROAIR HFA Inhalation Aerosol, or with the same formulation of albuterol as in PROAIR HFA Inhalation Aerosol, during the worldwide clinical development program.

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

Adult And Adolescents 12 Years Of Age And Older

The adverse reaction information presented in the table below concerning PROAIR HFA Inhalation Aerosol is derived from a 6-week, blinded study which compared PROAIR HFA Inhalation Aerosol (180 mcg four times daily) with a double-blinded matched placebo HFA-Inhalation Aerosol and an evaluator-blinded marketed active comparator HFA-134a albuterol inhaler in 172 asthmatic patients 12 to 76 years of age. The table lists the incidence of all adverse events (whether considered by the investigator drug related or unrelated to drug) from this study which occurred at a rate of 3% or greater in the PROAIR HFA Inhalation Aerosol treatment group and more frequently in the PROAIR HFA Inhalation Aerosol treatment group than in the matched placebo group. Overall, the incidence and nature of the adverse events reported for PROAIR HFA Inhalation Aerosol and the marketed active comparator HFA-134a albuterol inhaler were comparable.

Adverse Experience Incidences (% of Patients) in a Six-Week Clinical Trial*

Body System/ Adverse Event (as Preferred Term) PROAIR HFA Inhalation Aerosol
(N = 58)
Marketed active comparator HFA-134a albuterol inhaler
(N = 56)
Matched Placebo HFA-134a Inhalation Aerosol
(N = 58)
Body as a Whole Headache 7 5 2
Cardiovascular Tachycardia 3 2 0
Musculoskeletal Pain 3 0 0
Nervous System Dizziness 3 0 0
Respiratory System Pharyngitis 14 7 9
Rhinitis 5 4 2
* This table includes all adverse events (whether considered by the investigator drug related or unrelated to drug) which occurred at an incidence rate of at least 3.0% in the PROAIR HFA Inhalation Aerosol group and more frequently in the PROAIR HFA Inhalation Aerosol group than in the placebo HFA Inhalation Aerosol group.

Adverse events reported by less than 3% of the patients receiving PROAIR HFA Inhalation Aerosol but by a greater proportion of PROAIR HFA Inhalation Aerosol patients than the matched placebo patients, which have the potential to be related to PROAIR HFA Inhalation Aerosol, included chest pain, infection, diarrhea, glossitis, accidental injury (nervous system), anxiety, dyspnea, ear disorder, ear pain, and urinary tract infection.

In small cumulative dose studies, tremor, nervousness, and headache were the most frequently occurring adverse events.

Pediatric Patients 4 To 11 Years Of Age

Adverse events reported in a 3-week pediatric clinical trial comparing the same formulation of albuterol as in PROAIR HFA Inhalation Aerosol (180 mcg albuterol four times daily) to a matching placebo HFA inhalation aerosol occurred at a low incidence rate (no greater than 2% in the active treatment group) and were similar to those seen in adult and adolescent trials.

Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during postapproval use of PROAIR HFA. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. Reports have included rare cases of aggravated bronchospasm, lack of efficacy, asthma exacerbation (reported fatal in one case), muscle cramps, and various oropharyngeal side-effects such as throat irritation, altered taste, glossitis, tongue ulceration, and gagging.

The following adverse events have been observed in postapproval use of inhaled albuterol: urticaria, angioedema, rash, bronchospasm, hoarseness, oropharyngeal edema, and arrhythmias (including atrial fibrillation, supraventricular tachycardia, extrasystoles). In addition, albuterol, like other sympathomimetic agents, can cause adverse reactions such as: angina, hypertension or hypotension, palpitations, central nervous system stimulation, insomnia, headache, nervousness, tremor, muscle cramps, drying or irritation of the oropharynx, hypokalemia, hyperglycemia, and metabolic acidosis.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Proair (Albuterol Sulfate Inhalation Aerosol)

Albuterol (ProAir) Online Prescription

  • Request Albuterol (ProAir) inhalers online
  • Same day prescriptions available
  • Fast response time

Albuterol Sulfate – Overview

Albuterol, available as generic albuterol and also marketed under a variety of brand names such as Ventolin, is a medication used in the treatment of asthma. Push Health enables people who need albuterol prescriptions, including albuterol inhalers and albuterol nebulizers, to connect with a doctor or medical provider near them and get their albuterol delivered or available for pickup at a local pharmacy.

Albuterol Sulfate – Administration and Mechanism

Albuterol belongs to a class of drugs known as beta 2 adrenergic receptor agonists. Albuterol can cause smooth muscle relaxation which results in dilation of the bronchial passages. This is why albuterol is also referred to as a bronchodilator medication. Albuterol is typically administered via an inhaler (metered-dose inhaler or MDI) or a nebulizer. Albuterol can be administered as an intravenous drug although it is not typically done as nebulized albuterol is more convenient to administer and as effective. Albuterol sulfate is often the active ingredient in albuterol inhalers. Beta agonist medications are classified into short-acting, long-acting and ultra-long-acting beta 2 agonists. After being inhaled, albuterol demonstrates low systemic effects. The terminal plasma half-life of albuterol after inhalation aerosol is approximately six hours. The mean duration of effect is generally three to six hours.

Albuterol – Prescription Cost

Albuterol is used to treat asthma and COPD. As a prescription medication, it is not possible to buy albuterol over-the-counter (OTC). The cost of a prescription albuterol HFA inhaler typically ranges from $25 to $60 per inhaler. At times, it is possible to find an albuterol inhaler coupon from a manufacturer or other organizations.

Can I Buy Albuterol Online?

Generic albuterol inhalers and the branded versions require a prescription in order to be dispensed by a pharmacy. At this time, over-the-counter (OTC) albuterol is not available and one cannot simply buy albuterol inhalers online. Through Push Health, however, people can request an albuterol inhaler prescription from a licensed medical provider and get their albuterol if it is safe and appropriate to be prescribed.

Albuterol – Brand Differences

ProAir HFA utilizes the ingredient albuterol while Xopenex HFA features levalbuterol. And so, comparing ProAir HFA versus Xopenex HFA involves comparing albuterol versus levalbuterol. Major differences include the dose in each actuation and reported side effects. Albuterol is often used with ipratropium bromide (Atrovent HFA), a complementary asthma medication that is often administered at the same time to provide additional bronchodilation during an acute asthma exacerbation independently. Albuterol is also used in the combination medications Combivent and DuoNeb.

Is Albuterol A Steroid?

Some people wonder if albuterol is a steroid medication. While albuterol is sometimes given in conjunction with a steroid medication, albuterol sulfate itself is not a steroid. Instead, albuterol is a type of beta 2 adrenergic receptor agonist. However, albuterol is often prescribed with other steroid medications such as prednisone or fluticasone.

Albuterol – Side Effects

Generic albuterol and the branded version all can cause side effects. Common side effects that are sometimes experienced while using albuterol include a rapid heart rate, palpitations, tremulousness and stomach discomfort. Anyone who has demonstrated hypersensitivity or an allergy to albuterol should not use the medication. All questions and concerns that come up about using albuterol nebulizers or inhalers should be directed to one’s pharmacist and licensed medical provider prior to use.

More Albuterol Information

Last updated November 18, 2019. Given the evolving nature of medicine and science, this information might not be accurate and should not be construed as medical advice or diagnosis / treatment recommendations. Please consult a licensed medical provider if you have additional questions.

ProAir HFA

Generic Name: albuterol inhalation (al BYOO ter all)
Brand Name: ProAir HFA, ProAir RespiClick, Proventil HFA, Ventolin HFA

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Mar 15, 2019 – Written by Cerner Multum

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Interactions
  • More

What is ProAir HFA?

ProAir HFA is a bronchodilator that is used to treat or prevent bronchospasm in people with reversible obstructive airway disease. Albuterol is also used to prevent exercise-induced bronchospasm.

ProAir HFA is for use in adults and children who are at least 4 years old.

ProAir HFA may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important Information

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use ProAir HFA if you are allergic to albuterol. You should not use ProAir RespiClick if you are allergic to milk proteins.

ProAir HFA is not approved for use by anyone younger than 4 years old.

Albuterol may increase the risk of death or hospitalization in people with asthma, but the risk in people with obstructive airway disease or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not known.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • heart disease, high blood pressure;

  • a thyroid disorder;

  • seizures;

  • diabetes; or

  • low levels of potassium in your blood.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

If you are pregnant, your name may be listed on a pregnancy registry to track the effects of albuterol on the baby.

How should I use ProAir HFA?

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Read and carefully follow any Instructions for Use provided with your medicine. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you do not understand these instructions.

Do not allow a young child to use ProAir HFA without help from an adult.

To prevent exercise-induced bronchospasm, use this medicine 15 to 30 minutes before you exercise. The effects of albuterol inhalation should last about 4 to 6 hours.

Seek medical attention if your breathing problems get worse quickly, or if you think your asthma medications are not working as well.

Do not try to clean or take apart the ProAir RespiClick inhaler device.

Always use the new inhaler device provided with your refill. Do not float a medicine canister in water to see if it is empty.

Your dose needs may change due to surgery, illness, stress, or a recent asthma attack. Do not change your dose or dosing schedule without your doctor’s advice.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, or cold temperatures.

Keep the cover on your ProAir RespiClick inhaler when not in use. Store Proventil or Ventolin with the mouthpiece down.

Keep the inhaler canister away from open flame or high heat. The canister may explode if it gets too hot. Do not puncture or burn an empty inhaler canister.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not use two doses at one time.

Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of albuterol can be fatal.

Overdose symptoms may include dry mouth, tremors, chest pain, fast heartbeats, nausea, general ill feeling, seizure (convulsions), feeling light-headed or fainting.

What should I avoid while using ProAir HFA?

Rinse with water if ProAir HFA gets in your eyes.

ProAir HFA side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • wheezing, choking, or other breathing problems after using this medicine;

  • chest pain, fast heart rate, pounding heartbeats or fluttering in your chest;

  • severe headache, pounding in your neck or ears;

  • pain or burning when you urinate;

  • high blood sugar–increased thirst, increased urination, dry mouth, fruity breath odor; or

  • low potassium–leg cramps, constipation, irregular heartbeats, increased thirst or urination, numbness or tingling, muscle weakness or limp feeling.

Common side effects may include:

  • chest pain, fast or pounding heartbeats;

  • dizziness;

  • feeling shaky or nervous;

  • headache, back pain, body aches;

  • upset stomach; or

  • sore throat, sinus pain, runny or stuffy nose.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect ProAir HFA?

Tell your doctor about all your other medicines, especially:

  • any other inhaled medicines or bronchodilators;

  • digoxin;

  • a diuretic or “water pill”;

  • an antidepressant–amitriptyline, desipramine, imipramine, doxepin, nortriptyline, and others;

  • a beta blocker–atenolol, carvedilol, labetalol, metoprolol, propranolol, sotalol, and others; or

  • an MAO inhibitor–isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine, and others.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may affect ProAir HFA, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2018 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 8.03.

Related questions

  • Does either Ventolin or albuterol contain steroids?
  • What is albuterol sulfate and can I take it if I’m allergic to sulfa?
  • How do you use the ProAir Digihaler?
  • Does coffee help with asthma?

Medical Disclaimer

More about ProAir HFA (albuterol)

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  • Dosage Information
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  • Drug class: adrenergic bronchodilators
  • FDA Alerts (4)
  • FDA Approval History

Consumer resources

  • ProAir HFA (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Ventolin, Ventolin HFA, Proventil, Proventil HFA, … +5 more

Professional resources

  • ProAir HFA (FDA)
  • … +1 more

Related treatment guides

  • Asthma, Maintenance
  • Asthma, acute
  • Bronchiectasis
  • Bronchospasm Prophylaxis
  • COPD, Acute
  • COPD, Maintenance

Albuterol Sulfate

Brand Names: Accuneb, Airet, ProAir HFA, ProAir RespiClick, Proventil, Proventil HFA, ReliOn Ventolin HFA, Ventolin, Ventolin HFA, Ventolin Nebules

Generic Name: albuterol inhalation

  • What is albuterol inhalation?
  • What are the possible side effects of albuterol inhalation?
  • What is the most important information I should know about albuterol inhalation?
  • What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using albuterol inhalation?
  • How should I use albuterol inhalation?
  • What happens if I miss a dose?
  • What happens if I overdose?
  • What should I avoid while using albuterol inhalation?
  • What other drugs will affect albuterol inhalation?
  • Where can I get more information?

What is albuterol inhalation?

Albuterol inhalation is a bronchodilator that is used to treat or prevent bronchospasm in people with reversible obstructive airway disease. Albuterol is also used to prevent exercise-induced bronchospasm.

Albuterol inhalation is for use in adults and children who are at least 4 years old.

Albuterol inhalation may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of albuterol inhalation?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • wheezing, choking, or other breathing problems after using this medicine;
  • chest pain, fast heart rate, pounding heartbeats or fluttering in your chest;
  • severe headache, pounding in your neck or ears;
  • pain or burning when you urinate;
  • high blood sugar–increased thirst, increased urination, dry mouth, fruity breath odor; or
  • low potassium–leg cramps, constipation, irregular heartbeats, increased thirst or urination, numbness or tingling, muscle weakness or limp feeling.

Common side effects may include:

  • chest pain, fast or pounding heartbeats;
  • dizziness;
  • feeling shaky or nervous;
  • headache, back pain, body aches;
  • upset stomach; or
  • sore throat, sinus pain, runny or stuffy nose.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about albuterol inhalation?

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

Albuterol Oral Inhalation

Albuterol comes as a solution (liquid) to inhale by mouth using a special jet nebulizer (machine that turns medication into a mist that can be inhaled) and as an aerosol or powder to inhale by mouth using an inhaler. When the inhalation aerosol or powder for oral inhalation is used to treat or prevent symptoms of lung disease, it is usually used every 4 to 6 hours as needed. When the inhalation aerosol or powder for oral inhalation is used to prevent breathing difficulty during exercise, it is usually used 15 to 30 minutes before exercise. The nebulizer solution is usually used three or four times a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use albuterol exactly as directed. Do not use more or less of it or use it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Call your doctor if your symptoms worsen or if you feel that albuterol inhalation no longer controls your symptoms. If you were told to use albuterol as needed to treat your symptoms and you find that you need to use the medication more often than usual, call your doctor.

Albuterol controls symptoms of asthma and other lung diseases but does not cure them. Do not stop using albuterol without talking to your doctor.

Each albuterol aerosol inhaler is designed to provide 60 or 200 inhalations, depending on its size. Each albuterol powder inhaler is designed to provide 200 inhalations. After the labeled number of inhalations has been used, later inhalations may not contain the correct amount of medication. Dispose of the aerosol inhaler after you have used the labeled number of inhalations, even if it still contains some liquid and continues to release a spray when it is pressed. Dispose of the powder inhaler 13 months after you open the foil wrapper, after the expiration date on the package, or after you have used the labeled number of inhalation, whichever comes first.

Your inhaler may come with an attached counter that keeps track of the number of inhalations you have used. The counter also tells you when to call your doctor or pharmacist to refill your prescription and when there are no inhalations left in the inhaler. Read the manufacturer’s instructions to learn how to use the counter. If you have this type of inhaler, you should not try to change the numbers or remove the counter from the inhaler.

If your inhaler does not come with an attached counter, you will need to keep track of the number of inhalations you have used. You can divide the number of inhalations in your inhaler by the number of inhalations you use each day to find out how many days your inhaler will last. Do not float the canister in water to see if it still contains medication.

The inhaler that comes with albuterol aerosol is designed for use only with a canister of albuterol. Never use it to inhale any other medication, and do not use any other inhaler to inhale albuterol.

Be careful not to get albuterol inhalation into your eyes.

Do not use your albuterol inhaler when you are near a flame or source of heat. The inhaler may explode if it is exposed to very high temperatures.

Before you use albuterol inhaler or jet nebulizer for the first time, read the written instructions that come with the inhaler or nebulizer. Ask your doctor, pharmacist, or respiratory therapist to show you how to use it. Practice using the inhaler or nebulizer while he or she watches.

If your child will be using the inhaler, be sure that he or she knows how to use it. Watch your child each time he or she uses the inhaler to be sure that he or she is using it correctly.

To inhale the aerosol using an inhaler, follow these steps:

  1. Remove the protective dust cap from the end of the mouthpiece. If the dust cap was not placed on the mouthpiece, check the mouthpiece for dirt or other objects. Be sure that the canister is fully and firmly inserted in the mouthpiece.
  2. If you are using the inhaler for the first time or if you have not used the inhaler in more than 14 days, you will need to prime it. You may also need to prime the inhaler if it has been dropped. Ask your pharmacist or check the manufacturer’s information if this happens. To prime the inhaler, shake it well and then press down on the canister 4 times to release 4 sprays into the air, away from your face. Be careful not to get albuterol in your eyes.
  3. Shake the inhaler well.
  4. Breathe out as completely as possible through your mouth.
  5. Hold the canister with the mouthpiece on the bottom, facing you and the canister pointing upward. Place the open end of the mouthpiece into your mouth. Close your lips tightly around the mouthpiece.
  6. Breathe in slowly and deeply through the mouthpiece.At the same time, press down once on the container to spray the medication into your mouth.
  7. Try to hold your breath for 10 seconds. remove the inhaler, and breathe out slowly.
  8. If you were told to use 2 puffs, wait 1 minute and then repeat steps 3-7.
  9. Replace the protective cap on the inhaler.
  10. Clean your inhaler regularly. Follow the manufacturer’s directions carefully and ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions about cleaning your inhaler.

To inhale the powder using the inhaler, follow these steps. Do not use the Respiclick inhaler with a spacer:

  1. If you will be using a new inhaler for the first time, remove it from the foil wrapper. Look at the dose counter at the back of the inhaler and check that you see the number 200 in the window.
  2. Holding the inhaler upright, with the cap on the bottom and the inhaler pointing upwards, load the dose by opening the protective dust cap at the end of the mouthpiece until it clicks. Do not open the cap unless you are ready to use the inhaler. Every time the protective cap is opened, a dose is ready to inhale. You will see the number in the dose counter go down. Do not waste doses by opening the inhaler unless you are inhaling a dose.
  3. Breathe out as completely as possible through your mouth. Do not blow or exhale into the inhaler.
  4. Place the mouthpiece between your lips well into your mouth. Close your lips tightly around the mouthpiece. Inhale slowly and deeply through your mouth. Do not breath in through your nose. Make sure that your fingers or lips do not block the vent above the mouthpiece.
  5. Remove the inhaler from your mouth and hold your breath for 10 seconds or as long as you comfortably can. Do not blow or exhale through the inhaler.
  6. Close the cap firmly over the mouthpiece.
  7. If you are to inhale 2 puffs, repeat steps 2-6.
  8. Keep the inhaler clean and dry at all times. To clean your inhaler, use a clean, dry tissue or cloth. Do not wash or put any part of your inhaler in water.

To inhale the solution using a nebulizer, follow these steps;

  1. Remove one vial of albuterol solution from the foil pouch. Leave the rest of the vials in the pouch until you are ready to use them.
  2. Look at the liquid in the vial. It should be clear and colorless. Do not use the vial if the liquid is cloudy or discolored.
  3. Twist off the top of the vial and squeeze all of the liquid into the nebulizer reservoir. If you are using your nebulizer to inhale other medications, ask your doctor or pharmacist if you can place the other medications in the reservoir along with albuterol.
  4. Connect the nebulizer reservoir to the mouthpiece or face mask.
  5. Connect the nebulizer to the compressor.
  6. Place the mouthpiece in your mouth or put on the face mask. Sit in an upright, comfortable position and turn on the compressor.
  7. Breathe in calmly, deeply, and evenly for about 5-15 minutes until mist stops forming in the nebulizer chamber.
  8. Clean your nebulizer regularly. Follow the manufacturer’s directions carefully and ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions about cleaning your nebulizer.

Duoneb

PATIENT INFORMATION

DuoNeb®
(ipratropium bromide 0.5 mg/albuterol sulfate 3.0 mg*) Inhalation Solution

*Equivalent to 2.5 mg albuterol base

Patient’s Instructions for Use

Read this patient information completely every time your prescription is filled as information may have changed. Keep these instructions with your medication as you may want to read them again.

DuoNeb (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) should only be used under the direction of a physician. Your physician and pharmacist have more information about DuoNeb (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) and the condition for which it has been prescribed. Contact them if you have additional questions.

Storing your Medicine

Store DuoNeb (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) between 2°C and 25°C (36°F and 77°F). Vials should be protected from light before use, therefore, keep unused vials in the foil pouch or carton. Do not use after the expiration (EXP) date printed on the carton.

Dose

DuoNeb (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) is supplied as a single-dose, ready-to-use vial containing 3 mL of solution. No mixing or dilution is needed. Use one new vial for each nebulizer treatment.

FOLLOW THESE DIRECTIONS FOR USE OF YOUR NEBULIZER/COMPRESSOR OR THE DIRECTIONS GIVEN BY YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER. A TYPICAL EXAMPLE IS SHOWN BELOW.

Instructions for Use

1. Remove one vial from the foil pouch. Place remaining vials back into pouch for storage.

2. Twist the cap completely off the vial and squeeze the contents into the nebulizer reservoir (Figure 1).

Figure 1

3. Connect the nebulizer to the mouthpiece or face mask (Figure 2).

Figure 2

4. Connect the nebulizer to the compressor.

5. Sit in a comfortable, upright position; place the mouthpiece in your mouth (Figure 3) or put on the face mask (Figure 4); and turn on the compressor.

Figure 3

Figure 4

6. Breathe as calmly, deeply and evenly as possible through your mouth until no more mist is formed in the nebulizer chamber (about 5-15 minutes). At this point, the treatment is finished.

7. Clean the nebulizer (see manufacturer’s instructions).

DuoNeb®
(DOO-o-neb) (Ipratropium Bromide 0.5 mg/Albuterol Sulfate 3.0 mg*) Inhalation Solution

*Equivalent to 2.5 mg albuterol base

Read the patient information that comes with DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) before you start using it and each time you get a refill. There may be new information. This leaflet does not take the place of talking with your doctor about your medical condition or your treatment.

What is DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) ?

DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) is a combination of two medicines called bronchodilators. DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) contains albuterol sulfate, which is a beta-adrenergic agonist, and ipratropium bromide, which is an anticholinergic. These two medicines work together to help open the airways in your lungs. DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) is used to help treat airway narrowing (bronchospasm) that happens with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adult patients who need to use more than one bronchodilator medicine.

Who should not use DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) ?

Do not use DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) if you: Are allergic to any of the ingredients in DuoNeb (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) or to atropine. The active ingredients are albuterol sulfate and ipratropium bromide. See the end of this leaflet for a complete list of ingredients in DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) .

DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) has not been studied in patients younger than 18 years of age.

What should I tell my doctor before I start using DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) ?

Tell your doctor about all of your conditions, including if you:

  • Have heart problems. This includes coronary artery disease and heart rhythm problems.
  • Have high blood pressure
  • Have diabetes
  • Have or had seizures
  • Have a thyroid problem called hyperthyroidism
  • Have an eye problem called narrow-angle glaucoma
  • Have liver or kidney problems
  • Have problems urinating due to bladder-neck blockage or an enlarged prostate (men)
  • Are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. It is not known if DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) can harm your unborn baby. You and your doctor will have to decide if DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) is right for you during a pregnancy.
  • Are breastfeeding. It is not known if DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) passes into your milk or if it can harm your baby. You and your doctor should decide whether you should take DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) or breastfeed, but not both.

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins and herbal supplements. DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) and other medicines can interact. This may cause serious side effects. Especially tell your doctor if you take:

  • Other medicines that contain anticholinergics such as ipratropium bromide. This also includes medicines used for Parkinson’s disease.
  • Other medicines that contain beta-agonists such as albuterol sulfate. These are usually used to treat airway narrowing (bronchospasm).
  • Medicines called beta-blockers. These are usually used for high blood pressure or heart problems.
  • Medicines called “water pills” (diuretics)
  • Medicines for depression called monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) or tricyclic antidepressants.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure if you take any of these types of medicines. Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of them and show it to your doctor and pharmacists when you get a new medicine.

How should I use DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) ?

  • Read the Patient’s Instructions for Use that you get with your prescription. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.
  • Take DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not change your dose or how often you use DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) without talking to your doctor. Inhale DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) through your mouth and into your lungs using a machine called a nebulizer.
  • DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) may help to open your airways for up to 5 hours after taking this medicine. If DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) does not help your airway narrowing (bronchospasm) or your bronchospasm gets worse, call your doctor right away or get emergency help if needed.

What should I avoid while using DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) ?

Do not get DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) in your eyes. Be careful not to spray DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) in your eyes while you are using your nebulizer. DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) can cause the following short-term eye problems:

  • Enlarged pupils
  • Blurry vision
  • Eye pain

DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) can cause a serious eye problem called narrow-angle glaucoma or worsen the narrow-angle glaucoma you already have.

What are the possible side effects with DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) ?

DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) may cause the following serious side effects:

  • Worsening of the narrowing in your airways (bronchospasm). This side effect can be life-threatening and has happened with both of the medicines that are in DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) . Stop DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) and call your doctor right away or get emergency help if your breathing problems get worse while or after using DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) .
  • Serious and life-threatening allergic reactions. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction include:
    • Hives, rash
    • Swelling of your face, eyelids, lips, tongue, or throat, and trouble swallowing
    • Worsening of your breathing problems such as wheezing, chest tightness or shortness of breath
    • Shock (loss of blood pressure and consciousness)

The most common side effects with DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) include lung disease, sore throat, chest pain, constipation, diarrhea, bronchitis, urinary tract infection, leg cramps, nausea, upset stomach, voice changes, and pain.

These are not all the side effects with DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) . For a complete list, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

How should I store DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) ?

  • Store DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) between 36° and 77°F (2° and 25°C). Protect from light. Keep the unused vials in the foil pouch or carton.
  • Safely discard DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) that is out-of-date or no longer needed.
  • Keep DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) and all medicines out of the reach of children.

General advice about DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate)

Medicines are sometimes prescribed for conditions that are not mentioned in the patient information leaflets. Do not use DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) to other people, even if they have the same symptoms you have. It may harm them.

This leaflet summarizes the most important information about DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) . If you would like more information, talk with your doctor. You can ask your doctor or pharmacist for information about DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) that is written for healthcare professionals. You can also call the company that makes DuoNeb® (ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate) toll free at 1-800-755-5560 or visit their website at www.dey.com.

What are the ingredients in DuoNeb®?

Active Ingredients: ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate

Inactive Ingredients: sodium chloride, hydrochloric acid, and edetate sodium, USP.

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