Adverse effects of cefazolin

Ancef (injection)

Generic Name: cefazolin (injection) (sef A zoe lin)
Brand Name: Ancef, Kefzol

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Apr 19, 2019 – Written by Cerner Multum

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Interactions
  • More

What is Ancef?

Ancef is a cephalosporin (SEF a low spor in) antibiotic that is is used to treat bacterial infections, including severe or life-threatening forms. This medicine is also used to help prevent infection in people having certain types of surgery.

Ancef may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important Information

You should not use Ancef if you have ever had a severe allergic reaction to any type of cephalosporin antibiotic (Omnicef, Keflex, and others).

Before taking this medicine

You should not take Ancef if you are allergic to Ancef or to other cephalosporin antibiotics, such as:

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • kidney disease;

  • liver disease;

  • a stomach or intestinal disorder such as colitis; or

  • an allergy to any type of penicillin.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

How is Ancef given?

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Ancef is given as an infusion into a vein. A healthcare provider will give your first dose and may teach you how to properly use the medication by yourself.

Ancef may need to be mixed with a liquid (diluent) before using it. When using injections by yourself, be sure you understand how to properly mix and store the medicine.

Use this medicine for the full prescribed length of time, even if your symptoms quickly improve. Skipping doses can increase your risk of infection that is resistant to medication. Ancef will not treat a viral infection such as the flu or a common cold.

This medicine can affect the results of certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using Ancef.

Store unmixed Ancef at room temperature, away from moisture, heat, and light.

After mixing Ancef with a diluent, store the mixture in the refrigerator. Do not freeze.

Take the mixture out of the refrigerator and allow it to reach room temperature before injecting your dose. Mixed medicine must be used within a certain number of days once it reaches room temperature. Carefully follow all mixing and storage instructions for this medicine.

Do not use the medicine if it has changed colors or has particles in it. Call your pharmacist for new medication.

Use a needle and syringe only once and then place them in a puncture-proof “sharps” container. Follow state or local laws about how to dispose of this container. Keep it out of the reach of children and pets.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose of Ancef.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while using Ancef?

Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, call your doctor before using anti-diarrhea medicine.

Ancef side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction (hives, difficult breathing, swelling in your face or throat) or a severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, burning in your eyes, skin pain, red or purple skin rash that spreads and causes blistering and peeling).

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • severe stomach pain, diarrhea that is watery or bloody (even if it occurs months after your last dose);

  • white patches or sores inside your mouth or on your lips;

  • fever, swollen glands, rash or itching, joint pain, or general ill feeling;

  • seizure (convulsions); or

  • liver problems–upper stomach pain, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Common side effects may include:

  • nausea, vomiting, diarrhea;

  • rash; or

  • an allergic reaction.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Ancef?

Other drugs may affect Ancef, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any medicine you start or stop using.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2018 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 3.07.

Medical Disclaimer

More about Ancef (cefazolin)

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Interactions
  • En Español
  • Drug class: first generation cephalosporins
  • FDA Alerts (1)

Consumer resources

  • Ancef (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Kefzol

Professional resources

  • Ancef (AHFS Monograph)
  • … +1 more

Related treatment guides

  • Bacterial Endocarditis Prevention
  • Bacterial Infection
  • Bone infection
  • Cholecystitis
  • … +10 more

Cefazolin

Cefazolin is an antibiotic used to treat bacterial infections, marketed under the brand names Ancef and Kefzol.

The medicine is sometimes also used to prevent infections before, during, or after surgery.

Cefazolin is in a class of drugs known as cephalosporin antibiotics. It’s administered as an injection or as an intravenous (IV) drip.

The drug can target bacteria that cause infections of the lung, skin, bone, joint, stomach, blood, heart, valve, and urinary tract.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) first approved cefazolin in 1973. The drug is currently manufactured by several companies.

Cefazolin Warnings

Before taking cefazolin, tell your doctor if you have or have ever had:

  • Kidney, liver, or gastrointestinal disease (such as ulcerative colitis)
  • An allergy to penicillin or any other drugs
  • Bleeding problems
  • Diabetes

This medicine may cause false positive results on certain urine sugar tests. Talk to your doctor about this potential interaction.

Cefazolin only treats bacterial infections and won’t work for viral infections such as the common cold.

When receiving cefazolin in your vein or under your skin, you may be at risk for a catheter-related infection.

Tell your health care provider if you experience any of the following symptoms near your catheter:

  • Tenderness
  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Warmth
  • Redness
  • Drainage
  • Irritation
  • Fever

Tell your doctor if your condition doesn’t improve or worsens while taking cefazolin.

In rare cases, cefazolin may cause a severe intestinal condition known as Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of the following symptoms:

  • Persistent or severe diarrhea
  • Severe stomach pain or cramping
  • Blood or mucus in your stool

Using this medicine for a long time may cause oral thrush or a new vaginal yeast infection. Call your doctor if you notice white patches in your mouth or a change in vaginal discharge.

Long-term use of cefazolin may also cause a second infection. Tell your doctor if you experience any signs of another infection during your treatment.

Elderly people may be more sensitive to the side effects of cefazolin. This medicine should be used with caution in older adults.

Pregnancy and Cefazolin

Cefazolin is not likely to harm an unborn baby.

Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant or plan to become pregnant before taking this medicine.

The drug is found in breast milk. Talk to your doctor before taking this medicine if you’re breastfeeding a baby.

Generic Name: Cefazolin (sef A zoe lin)

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Jul 24, 2019.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Interactions
  • More

Uses of Cefazolin:

  • It is used to treat or prevent bacterial infections.

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Cefazolin?

  • If you have an allergy to cefazolin or any other part of cefazolin.
  • If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.

This medicine may interact with other drugs or health problems.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take cefazolin with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take Cefazolin?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take cefazolin. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Very bad and sometimes deadly allergic side effects have rarely happened with drugs like this one. Talk with the doctor.
  • Do not use longer than you have been told. A second infection may happen.
  • Have your blood work checked if you are on cefazolin for a long time. Talk with your doctor.
  • If you have high blood sugar (diabetes) and test your urine glucose, talk with your doctor to find out which tests are best to use.
  • This medicine may affect certain lab tests. Tell all of your health care providers and lab workers that you take cefazolin.
  • If you are 65 or older, use cefazolin with care. You could have more side effects.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan on getting pregnant, or are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks to you and the baby.

How is this medicine (Cefazolin) best taken?

Use cefazolin as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

  • It is given as a shot into a muscle or vein.
  • It is given as an infusion into a vein over a period of time.

What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • Call your doctor to find out what to do.

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of liver problems like dark urine, feeling tired, not hungry, upset stomach or stomach pain, light-colored stools, throwing up, or yellow skin or eyes.
  • Signs of kidney problems like unable to pass urine, change in how much urine is passed, blood in the urine, or a big weight gain.
  • Any unexplained bruising or bleeding.
  • Redness or white patches in mouth or throat.
  • Fever or chills.
  • Sore throat.
  • Feeling very tired or weak.
  • Seizures.
  • Anal irritation.
  • Vaginal itching or discharge.
  • Diarrhea is common with antibiotics. Rarely, a severe form called C diff–associated diarrhea (CDAD) may happen. Sometimes, this has led to a deadly bowel problem (colitis). CDAD may happen during or a few months after taking antibiotics. Call your doctor right away if you have stomach pain, cramps, or very loose, watery, or bloody stools. Check with your doctor before treating diarrhea.
  • A very bad skin reaction (Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis) may happen. It can cause very bad health problems that may not go away, and sometimes death. Get medical help right away if you have signs like red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin (with or without fever); red or irritated eyes; or sores in your mouth, throat, nose, or eyes.

What are some other side effects of Cefazolin?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Not hungry.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

How do I store and/or throw out Cefazolin?

  • If you need to store cefazolin at home, talk with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist about how to store it.

Consumer information use

  • If your symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your doctor.
  • Do not share your drugs with others and do not take anyone else’s drugs.
  • Keep a list of all your drugs (prescription, natural products, vitamins, OTC) with you. Give this list to your doctor.
  • Talk with the doctor before starting any new drug, including prescription or OTC, natural products, or vitamins.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Throw away unused or expired drugs. Do not flush down a toilet or pour down a drain unless you are told to do so. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about the best way to throw out drugs. There may be drug take-back programs in your area.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. Check with your pharmacist. If you have any questions about cefazolin, please talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Medical Disclaimer

More about cefazolin

  • Side Effects
  • During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding
  • Dosage Information
  • Drug Interactions
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • En Español
  • 1 Review
  • Drug class: first generation cephalosporins
  • FDA Alerts (1)
  • Cefazolin injection
  • Cefazolin Injection (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Ancef, Kefzol

  • Cefazolin Sodium (AHFS Monograph)
  • … +3 more
  • Bacterial Endocarditis Prevention
  • Bacterial Infection
  • Bone infection
  • Cholecystitis
  • … +10 more

cefazolin (injection)

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using cefazolin?

You should not take this medicine if you are allergic to cefazolin or to other cephalosporin antibiotics, such as:

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • kidney disease;
  • liver disease;
  • a stomach or intestinal disorder such as colitis; or
  • an allergy to any type of penicillin.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

How is cefazolin given?

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Cefazolin is given as an infusion into a vein. A healthcare provider will give your first dose and may teach you how to properly use the medication by yourself.

Cefazolin may need to be mixed with a liquid (diluent) before using it. When using injections by yourself, be sure you understand how to properly mix and store the medicine.

Use this medicine for the full prescribed length of time, even if your symptoms quickly improve. Skipping doses can increase your risk of infection that is resistant to medication. Cefazolin will not treat a viral infection such as the flu or a common cold.

This medicine can affect the results of certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using cefazolin.

Store unmixed cefazolin at room temperature, away from moisture, heat, and light.

After mixing cefazolin with a diluent, store the mixture in the refrigerator. Do not freeze.

Take the mixture out of the refrigerator and allow it to reach room temperature before injecting your dose. Mixed medicine must be used within a certain number of days once it reaches room temperature. Carefully follow all mixing and storage instructions for this medicine.

Do not use the medicine if it has changed colors or has particles in it. Call your pharmacist for new medication.

Use a needle and syringe only once and then place them in a puncture-proof “sharps” container. Follow state or local laws about how to dispose of this container. Keep it out of the reach of children and pets.

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