150 mg of trazodone

Trazodone

Generic Name: trazodone (TRAZ oh done)
Brand Names: Desyrel, Desyrel Dividose, Oleptro

Medically reviewed by Sanjai Sinha, MD Last updated on Dec 2, 2019.

  • Overview
  • Side Effects
  • Dosage
  • Professional
  • Tips
  • Interactions
  • More

What is trazodone?

Trazodone is an antidepressant that belongs to a group of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). It affects chemicals in the brain that may be unbalanced in people with depression.

Trazodone is used to treat major depressive disorder.

It may help to improve your mood, appetite, and energy level as well as decrease anxiety and insomnia related to depression.

Trazodone works by helping to restore the balance of a certain natural chemical (serotonin) in the brain.

Important Information

You should not use trazodone if you are allergic to it, or if you are being treated with methylene blue injection.

Do not use this medicine if you have taken an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, and tranylcypromine.

Some young people have thoughts about suicide when first taking an antidepressant. Your doctor will need to check your progress at regular visits while you are using trazodone. Your family or other caregivers should also be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms.

Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor, such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Do not give this medicine to anyone younger than 18 years old without the advice of a doctor. Trazodone is not approved for use in children.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use trazodone if you are allergic to it.

Do not use trazodone if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine, and others.

After you stop taking trazodone, you must wait at least 14 days before you start taking an MAOI.

To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • liver or kidney disease;

  • heart disease, or a recent heart attack;

  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder;

  • seizures or epilepsy;

  • narrow-angle glaucoma;

  • long QT syndrome;

  • drug addiction or suicidal thoughts; or

  • bipolar disorder (manic depression).

Some young people have thoughts about suicide when first taking an antidepressant. Your doctor should check your progress at regular visits. Your family or other caregivers should also be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms.

Be sure your doctor knows if you also take stimulant medicine, opioid medicine, herbal products, or medicine for depression, mental illness, Parkinson’s disease, migraine headaches, serious infections, or prevention of nausea and vomiting. These medicines may interact with trazodone and cause a serious condition called serotonin syndrome.

Ask your doctor about taking this medicine if you are pregnant. It is not known whether trazodone will harm an unborn baby. However, you may have a relapse of depression if you stop taking your antidepressant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant. Do not start or stop taking this medicine without your doctor’s advice.

If you are pregnant, your name may be listed on a pregnancy registry to track the effects of trazodone on the baby.

It may not be safe to breast-feed while using this medicine. Ask your doctor about any risk.

Trazodone is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old.

How should I take trazodone?

Take trazodone exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose.

Take trazodone after a meal or a snack.

It may take up to 2 weeks before your symptoms improve. Keep using the medication as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve.

You should not stop using this medicine suddenly, or you could have unpleasant symptoms (such as dizziness, vomiting, agitation, sweating, confusion, numbness, tingling, or electric shock feelings). Ask your doctor how to safely stop using this medicine.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of trazodone can be fatal when it is taken with alcohol, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, or sedatives such as diazepam (Valium).

Overdose symptoms may include extreme drowsiness, vomiting, penis erection that is painful or prolonged, fast or pounding heartbeat, seizure (black-out or convulsions), or breathing that slows or stops.

What should I avoid while taking trazodone?

Do not drink alcohol. Dangerous side effects or death could occur.

Avoid driving or hazardous activity until you know how trazodone will affect you. Your reactions could be impaired.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy.

Trazodone side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to trazodone: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop taking trazodone and call your doctor at once if you have a penis erection that is painful or lasts 6 hours or longer. This is a medical emergency and could lead to a serious condition that must be corrected with surgery.

Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor, such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • fast or pounding heartbeats, fluttering in your chest, shortness of breath, and sudden dizziness (like you might pass out);

  • slow heartbeats;

  • unusual thoughts or behavior;

  • easy bruising, unusual bleeding; or

  • low levels of sodium in the body – headache, confusion, slurred speech, severe weakness, vomiting, loss of coordination, feeling unsteady.

Seek medical attention right away if you have symptoms of serotonin syndrome, such as: agitation, hallucinations, fever, sweating, shivering, fast heart rate, muscle stiffness, twitching, loss of coordination, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.

Common trazodone side effects may include:

  • drowsiness, dizziness, tiredness;

  • swelling;

  • weight loss;

  • blurred vision;

  • diarrhea, constipation; or

  • stuffy nose.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect trazodone?

Ask your doctor before taking a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac, indomethacin, meloxicam, and others. Using an NSAID with trazodone may cause you to bruise or bleed easily.

Using trazodone with other drugs that make you drowsy can worsen this effect. Ask your doctor before using opioid medication, a sleeping pill, a muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety or seizures.

Tell your doctor about all your current medicines. Many drugs can interact with trazodone, especially:

  • any other antidepressants;

  • phenytoin;

  • St. John’s wort;

  • tramadol;

  • a diuretic or “water pill”;

  • medicine to treat anxiety, mood disorders, or mental illness such as schizophrenia;

  • a blood thinner – warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven; or

  • migraine headache medicine – sumatriptan, Imitrex, Maxalt, Treximet, and others.

This list is not complete and many other drugs may affect trazodone. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use trazodone only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 10.02.

Related questions

  • How long does 100mg trazodone stay in your system?

Medical Disclaimer

More about trazodone

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  • Drug class: phenylpiperazine antidepressants
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Consumer resources

  • Trazodone Extended-Release Tablets
  • Trazodone Tablets
  • Trazodone Oral (Advanced Reading)

Other brands: Desyrel, Oleptro, Desyrel Dividose

Professional resources

  • Trazodone Hydrochloride (AHFS Monograph)
  • … +2 more

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Trazodone Long-Term Side Effects

What Is Trazodone?

Sadness is a natural part of life. Grief over a breakup or the disappointment of a failure can cause one to be sad. Normally, a person’s mood will improve over time. When sadness or a low mood is persistent and unrelenting for weeks, months or years, the individual may be suffering from major depressive disorder.

Trazodone is an antidepressant primarily indicated for use in treating major depressive disorder but perhaps more commonly used off-label for managing insomnia. Previously available brand formulations include Desyrel and an extended-release tablet form, Oleptro.

As an atypical antidepressant, trazodone does not fit neatly into some of the more standard antidepressant classes (e.g., SSRIs, MAOIs, tricyclic antidepressants, etc.). Trazodone is sometimes categorized according to its mechanism of action, which is as a serotonin receptor (5HT2a) antagonist and reuptake inhibitor, or SARI.

While its precise mechanism of action is not fully understood, trazodone’s therapeutic benefit, like many modern antidepressant medications, is thought to start with an increase in serotonin activity throughout the brain. It is indicated for use (as mono-therapy or as an adjunct treatment) for major depressive disorder.

Trazodone is perhaps most widely used to manage insomnia (both depression-related and otherwise), but has additional off-label indications as an adjunctive pharmacotherapeutic for conditions like schizophrenia, anxiety, dementia, and Alzheimer’s.

How Common is Trazodone Abuse?

In the US, there’s been an increase in all prescription drug abuse, including abuse of antidepressants. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, over 20% of all Americans over age 12 had used a prescription drug for non-medical purposes at some point in their lives. While most people don’t misuse trazodone, it does happen.

According to an article in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, trazodone is thought to have a lower abuse liability than benzodiazepine drugs like triazolam or other hypnotics prescribed for insomnia, which may be why its off-label use for the treatment of insomnia has surpassed its use for the management of major depression.

The side effects of trazodone may be a concern and include symptoms such as orthostatic hypotention, priapism (painful, lasting erections), and cardiac arrhythmias. These side effects may be enough of a warning that some users want to discontinue the medication. Abruptly stopping, however, may trigger a discontinuation syndrome, with some characteristic of withdrawal symptoms.

Warnings and Risks

Because it is antidepressant, it is important to note the warnings and risks associated with trazodone before you take it:

  • The use of antidepressants is associated with a slight risk of serotonin syndrome, a potentially fatal condition characterized by changes in mental status, as well as neuromuscular and autonomic hyperactivity.
  • Trazodone may cause heart rhythm abnormalities. Patients with underlying cardiac conditions should discuss the risks of trazodone with their physicians.
  • Orthostatic hypotension (drop in blood pressure upon standing) and fainting may occur in some patients.
  • Prolonged, painful erections (priapism) may occur in some males taking trazodone.
  • Trazodone may increase bleeding risk, especially when combined with NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen.
  • Among patients with bipolar disorder, trazodone has the potential to activate manic/hypomanic states.
  • In rare cases, trazodone can worsen some of the symptoms of depression and may result in suicidal thinking.

These warnings apply to individuals taking trazodone as prescribed. Abuse of the drug may make an individual more likely to experience one or more of the above issues.

Long Term Effects of Trazodone

While trazodone is generally safe and effective when used as directed for its intended purpose, someone who misuses trazodone for extended periods of time may be at risk of experiencing more intense side effects, which may include:

  • Decreased serum sodium levels (hyponatremia) and associated symptoms (headache, concentration problems, memory problems, confusion, weakness, unsteadiness, increased fall risk).
  • Serotonin syndrome.
  • Confusion.
  • Angle-closure glaucoma.
  • Blurred vision.
  • Hypotension.
  • Fainting.
  • Coordination problems.
  • Tremors.
  • Gastrointestinal upset.
  • Heart rate and rhythm abnormalities.

An article in the Journal of Sleep Research states that prolonged use of trazodone can also cause the following:

  • Short-term memory dysfunctions.
  • Verbal learning issues.
  • Equilibrium disruption.
  • Next-day memory performance problems.
  • Difficulties with arm muscle endurance.

Long-term prescription use carries its own set of risks that may be outweighed by the benefits; however, if you are abusing the drug, you may be placing yourself at greater risk and may overdose.

What Happens if you Take Too Much Trazodone?

Taking too much trazodone at a time may be dangerous. An overdose may cause symptoms such as:

  • Hypotension (low blood pressure that may result in fainting).
  • Chest pain.
  • Trouble breathing.
  • Drowsiness.
  • Tremor.
  • Cardiac arrhythmias.
  • Seizures.
  • Coma.

Learn More about Trazodone Overdose Dangers

Trazodone Withdrawal Symptoms

Individuals may feel generally unwell when abruptly stopping trazodone. The symptoms of trazodone discontinuation syndrome may be worse for those who take more than the recommended dose.

Duration of use plays a role in how uncomfortable the withdrawal symptoms are as well, with those who use the drug for greater lengths of time potentially experiencing more intense symptoms.

Withdrawal symptoms that may arise from suddenly stopping trazodone may include:

Because the drug is used to treat depression and insomnia, some symptoms of depression and sleep disturbances may return after stopping the drug.

How to Manage Trazodone Withdrawal?

In some instances, medical staff members may prescribe a taper to slowly wean the person off the medication. A tapered approach helps to reduce the symptoms of withdrawal. How long the taper will take will vary from person to person. Medical staff can discuss with you what you can expect.

In the case that someone is abusing several substances, medical detox may be recommended to manage troubling symptoms and prevent any medical complications. Once detox is complete, addiction treatment may be needed to address the underlying causes of compulsive substance use.

More On Long-term Effects:

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Greenhouse Treatment Center has the experienced and licensed medical staff to help patients undergo treatment specific to their needs. If you find that you’re struggling with the misuse of trazodone, options are available. Together we can help you reach long-term sobriety one step at a time.

Sources:

Before taking trazodone,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to trazodone or any other medications.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, and nutritional supplements you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: anticoagulants (‘blood thinners’) such as warfarin (Coumadin); antidepressants; antifungals such as ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), or voriconazole (Vfend); aspirin and other NSAIDs such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn); certain medications for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) such as atazanavir (Reyataz), indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), ritonavir (Norvir, in Kaletra), and saquinavir (Invirase); cimetidine (Tagamet); cisapride (Propulsid); clarithromycin (Biaxin, in Prevpac); cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); danazol (Danocrine); delavirdine (Rescriptor); dexamethasone (Decadron); digoxin (Digitek, Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor, Tiazac); diuretics; disopyramide (Norpace); dofetilide (Tikosyn); erythromycin (E.E.S., E-Mycin, Erythrocin); isoniazid (INH, Nydrazid); medications for allergies, cough or colds; medications for anxiety, high blood pressure, irregular heartbeat, mental illness or pain; medication for seizures such as carbamazepine (Tegretol), ethosuximide (Zarontin), phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton), and phenytoin (Dilantin); linezolid (Zyvox); methylene blue; metronidazole (Flagyl); muscle relaxants; nefazodone; oral contraceptives (birth control pills); procainamide (Procanbid, Pronestyl); quinidine; rifabutin (Mycobutin); rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); sedatives; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem) and fluvoxamine (Luvox); sleeping pills; tranquilizers; sotalol (Betapace, Betapace AF); telithromycin (Ketek); thioridazine; troleandomycin (TAO); verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan); or zafirlukast (Accolate). Also, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking the following medications, called MAO inhibitors, or if you have stopped taking them within the past 2 weeks: isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor if you have severe diarrhea or vomiting or think you may be dehydrated or if you have recently had a heart attack. Also tell your doctor if you have or have ever had high blood pressure, sickle cell anemia (a disease of the red blood cells), multiple myeloma (cancer of the plasma cells), leukemia (cancer of the white blood cells) cavernosal fibrosis, Peyronie’s disease (a condition that affects the shape of the penis such as angulation), or heart, liver or kidney disease.
  • Trazodone may cause QT prolongation (an irregular heart rhythm that can lead to fainting, loss of consciousness, seizures, or sudden death. Tell your doctor if you or anyone in your family has or has ever had long QT syndrome (an inherited condition in which a person is more likely to have QT prolongation) or if you have or have ever had low levels of potassium or magnesium in your blood or an irregular heartbeat.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking trazodone, call your doctor.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking trazodone.
  • you should know that trazodone may make you drowsy and affect your judgment. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how this medication affects you.
  • ask your doctor about the safe use of alcoholic beverages while you are taking trazodone. Alcohol can make the side effects from trazodone worse.
  • you should know that trazodone may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, and fainting when you get up too quickly from a lying position. To avoid this problem, get out of bed slowly, resting your feet on the floor for a few minutes before standing up.
  • you should know that trazodone may cause angle-closure glaucoma (a condition where the fluid is suddenly blocked and unable to flow out of the eye causing a quick, severe increase in eye pressure which may lead to a loss of vision). Talk to your doctor about having an eye examination before you start taking this medication. If you have nausea, eye pain, changes in vision, such as seeing colored rings around lights, and swelling or redness in or around the eye, call your doctor or get emergency medical treatment right away.

Desyrel

Generic Name: Trazodone (TRAZ-oh-dohn)

Drug Class: Antidepressant, Miscellaneous

Table of Contents

  • Overview
  • How to Take It
  • Side Effects
  • Warnings & Precautions
  • Drug Interactions
  • Dosage & Missing a Dose
  • Storage
  • Pregnancy or Nursing
  • More Information

Overview

Desyrel (trazodone) is used to treat all types of depression. It belongs to the SARI (serotonin antagonist and reuptake inhibitor) class. It is also used to treat anxiety and insomnia related to depression. Your doctor may use this medicine to treat other conditions.

This medicine helps relieve depression by increasing the amount of a chemical called serotonin in the brain centers.

This information is for educational purposes only. Not every known side effect, adverse effect, or drug interaction is in this database. If you have questions about your medicines, talk to your health care provider.

How to Take It

This medicine should be taken with food and the tablet can be crushed. If it causes excessive drowsiness or dizziness the larger portion of it should be taken at bedtime and the rest should be divided into two or three doses for the daily usage.

Side Effects

Side effects that may occur while taking this medicine include:

  • changes in weight, weight gain
  • dry mouth
  • constipation
  • drowsiness
  • confusion
  • lightheadedness

Contact your doctor immediately if you experience:

  • tremors or shaking
  • sore throat
  • trouble breathing
  • seizures
  • irregular or fast heartbeat
  • ringing in the ears
  • eye swelling or pain
  • blood in urine/problems urinating
  • nightmares
  • fever
  • fainting

Warnings & Precautions

  • Talk to your doctor before you take this medicine if you have a history of heart disease, epilepsy, alcoholism, liver or kidney disease, or if you are having general anesthesia.
  • DO NOT use trazodone if you are allergic to it or if you are being treated with methylene blue injections.
  • Alcohol can add to the side effects of this medicine and should be avoided.
  • This medicine causes dizziness or drowsiness. DO NOT drive, and restrict activities until you know how this medicine will affect you.
  • DO NOT use trazodone if in the past 2 weeks you have taken an MAO inhibitor.
  • A rare side effect causing a prolonged painful erection in males (priaprism) has occurred. If you experience this, stop taking the drug and contact your healthcare provider immediately.
  • For an overdose, seek medical attention immediately. For non emergencies, contact your local or regional poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

Drug Interactions

This medicine may increase the affects antihypertensive drugs, drugs with sedative effects, phenytoin (Dilantin) or fosphenytoin (Celebyx) and tramadol (Ultram).

Dosage & Missed Dose

Trazodone is available as an extended-release or regular release oral tablet. The tablets should not be chewed or crushed. They may be broken in half, depending on dose prescribed by your doctor.

Take regular tablets with food 2 or more times / day.

Take extended-release tablets, once / day at bedtime on an empty stomach.

If you miss a dose, take your next dose as soon as you remember. If it is time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular schedule. Do not double doses or take extra medicine to make up for the missed dose.

Storage

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (preferably not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed.

Pregnancy/Nursing

Lung problems or other complications in the baby may arise if you are taking this medication while pregnant. There is risk of depression relapse if you stop taking your antidepressant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant while taking Trazodone. Do not start or stop taking this medicine during pregnancy without consulting your doctor.

More Information

For more information, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or health care provider, or you can visit this website, https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a681038.html for additional information from the manufacturer of this drug.

Desyrel

Trazodone Dosage Differences

The next dosage above 100 mg is trazodone 150 mg. The highest dose beyond trazodone 150 mg is 300 mg.

For the treatment of depression, it’s not recommended that patients take more than 300 mg a day unless they have severe depression. Regardless of the dose someone starts at, their doctor may opt to increase it at regular intervals, and it can be taken with food to prevent nausea.

Some guidelines do recommend that for the treatment of depression in adults the dosage start with 150 mg and then it should go up by 50 mg every few days up to 400 mg daily in divided doses for outpatient use. For inpatient use dosages may go up to 600 mg, divided daily.

There is also an extended-release version of trazodone, and the starting dosage for this is around 150 mg taken once a day, and it can be increased by 75 mg every few days.

When trazodone is used for the treatment of insomnia, it may only be used intermittently or for short periods of time, although in some cases it may be used regularly.

When a trazodone dosage is given for depression, it’s recommended you stay on it for at least six to 12 months, although many patients may be prescribed to use it over the long-term. It has relatively low long-term effects.

Once a physician feels like the appropriate response is achieved, in some cases dosages might be reduced or tapered. It is possible for people to experience a physical dependence to trazodone, which means if they stop taking it suddenly they could go through withdrawal.

Doctors will usually create a tapering schedule to help people, particularly who have been on trazodone long-term or take high doses, stop using it safely and comfortably.
While these are general trazodone dosage guidelines, it’s important that you rely only on the information provided to you by your doctor.

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  • Dosage forms

    Form Route Strength
    Tablet Oral 300 mg/1
    Tablet, extended release Oral 150 mg/1
    Tablet, extended release Oral 150 mg
    Tablet, extended release Oral 300 mg
    Tablet, extended release Oral 300 mg/1
    Tablet Oral
    Kit Oral
    Tablet Oral 100 mg
    Tablet Oral 150 mg
    Tablet Oral 50 mg
    Powder Not applicable 1 kg/1kg
    Tablet Oral 100 mg/1
    Tablet Oral 100 mg/301
    Tablet Oral 150 mg/1
    Tablet Oral 50 mg/301
    Tablet Oral 50 mg/1
    Tablet, film coated Oral 100 mg/1
    Tablet, film coated Oral 150 mg/1
    Tablet, film coated Oral 50 mg/1

    Prices

    Unit description Cost Unit
    Trazodone hcl powder 8.26USD g
    Desyrel 300 mg tablet 6.03USD tablet
    TraZODone HCl 300 mg tablet 5.65USD tablet
    Trazodone 300 mg tablet 5.44USD tablet
    Desyrel 100 mg tablet 4.6USD tablet
    Desyrel 150 mg tablet 3.39USD tablet
    TraZODone HCl 150 mg tablet 1.53USD tablet
    Trazodone 150 mg tablet 1.47USD tablet
    Desyrel 50 mg tablet 1.33USD tablet
    TraZODone HCl 100 mg tablet 0.76USD tablet
    Trazodone 100 mg tablet 0.73USD tablet
    Apo-Trazodone D 150 mg Tablet 0.61USD tablet
    Desyrel Dividose 150 mg Tablet 0.61USD tablet
    Novo-Trazodone 150 mg Tablet 0.61USD tablet
    Nu-Trazodone-D 150 mg Tablet 0.61USD tablet
    Ratio-Trazodone 150 mg Tablet 0.61USD tablet
    TraZODone HCl 50 mg tablet 0.59USD tablet
    Trazodone 50 mg tablet 0.57USD tablet
    Nu-Trazodone 100 mg Tablet 0.41USD tablet
    Pms-Trazodone 100 mg Tablet 0.41USD tablet
    Ratio-Trazodone 100 mg Tablet 0.41USD tablet
    Apo-Trazodone 100 mg Tablet 0.41USD tablet
    Desyrel 100 mg Tablet 0.41USD tablet
    Mylan-Trazodone 100 mg Tablet 0.41USD tablet
    Novo-Trazodone 100 mg Tablet 0.41USD tablet
    Pms-Trazodone 75 mg Tablet 0.34USD tablet
    Apo-Trazodone 50 mg Tablet 0.23USD tablet
    Mylan-Trazodone 50 mg Tablet 0.23USD tablet
    Novo-Trazodone 50 mg Tablet 0.23USD tablet
    Nu-Trazodone 50 mg Tablet 0.23USD tablet
    Pms-Trazodone 50 mg Tablet 0.23USD tablet
    Ratio-Trazodone 50 mg Tablet 0.23USD tablet

    DrugBank does not sell nor buy drugs. Pricing information is supplied for informational purposes only. Patents

    Patent Number Pediatric Extension Approved Expires (estimated)
    Unlock Additional Data
    US8133893 No 2012-03-13 2029-03-13 US
    US6607748 No 2003-08-19 2020-06-29 US
    US7829120 No 2010-11-09 2027-03-27 US

    Additional Data Available

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    Properties

    State Solid Experimental Properties Predicted Properties

    Property Value Source
    Water Solubility 0.29 mg/mL ALOGPS
    logP 2.68 ALOGPS
    logP 3.13 ChemAxon
    logS -3.1 ALOGPS
    pKa (Strongest Basic) 7.09 ChemAxon
    Physiological Charge 1 ChemAxon
    Hydrogen Acceptor Count 4 ChemAxon
    Hydrogen Donor Count 0 ChemAxon
    Polar Surface Area 42.39 Å2 ChemAxon
    Rotatable Bond Count 5 ChemAxon
    Refractivity 105.88 m3·mol-1 ChemAxon
    Polarizability 40.12 Å3 ChemAxon
    Number of Rings 4 ChemAxon
    Bioavailability 1 ChemAxon
    Rule of Five Yes ChemAxon
    Ghose Filter Yes ChemAxon
    Veber’s Rule No ChemAxon
    MDDR-like Rule No ChemAxon

    Predicted ADMET features

    Property Value Probability
    Human Intestinal Absorption + 1.0
    Blood Brain Barrier + 0.9829
    Caco-2 permeable 0.6166
    P-glycoprotein substrate Substrate 0.547
    P-glycoprotein inhibitor I Inhibitor 0.8634
    P-glycoprotein inhibitor II Inhibitor 0.8889
    Renal organic cation transporter Inhibitor 0.6479
    CYP450 2C9 substrate Non-substrate 0.7897
    CYP450 2D6 substrate Substrate 0.8919
    CYP450 3A4 substrate Substrate 0.7408
    CYP450 1A2 substrate Non-inhibitor 0.9045
    CYP450 2C9 inhibitor Non-inhibitor 0.9071
    CYP450 2D6 inhibitor Non-inhibitor 0.9231
    CYP450 2C19 inhibitor Non-inhibitor 0.9026
    CYP450 3A4 inhibitor Non-inhibitor 0.6613
    CYP450 inhibitory promiscuity High CYP Inhibitory Promiscuity 0.83
    Ames test Non AMES toxic 0.5133
    Carcinogenicity Non-carcinogens 0.8545
    Biodegradation Not ready biodegradable 1.0
    Rat acute toxicity 2.7007 LD50, mol/kg Not applicable
    hERG inhibition (predictor I) Strong inhibitor 0.8994
    hERG inhibition (predictor II) Inhibitor 0.7503

    ADMET data is predicted using admetSAR, a free tool for evaluating chemical ADMET properties. (23092397)

    Spectra

    Mass Spec (NIST) Not Available Spectra

    Spectrum Spectrum Type Splash Key
    Predicted GC-MS Spectrum – GC-MS Predicted GC-MS Not Available
    Mass Spectrum (Electron Ionization) MS splash10-0a4i-7980000000-5d2bde624fdd9a946993
    Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 10V, Positive (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
    Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 20V, Positive (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
    Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 40V, Positive (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
    Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 10V, Negative (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
    Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 20V, Negative (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
    Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 40V, Negative (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
    MS/MS Spectrum – , positive LC-MS/MS splash10-00di-0609000000-cee74b5bf3182c2aa324

    Taxonomy

    Description This compound belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylpiperazines. These are compounds containing a phenylpiperazine skeleton, which consists of a piperazine bound to a phenyl group. Kingdom Organic compounds Super Class Organoheterocyclic compounds Class Diazinanes Sub Class Piperazines Direct Parent Phenylpiperazines Alternative Parents N-arylpiperazines / Aryl 1,2,4-triazolones / Triazolopyridines / Aniline and substituted anilines / Dialkylarylamines / Pyridinones / Chlorobenzenes / N-alkylpiperazines / Aryl chlorides / Heteroaromatic compoundsTrialkylamines / Azacyclic compounds / Hydrocarbon derivatives / Organopnictogen compounds / Organooxygen compounds / Organic oxides / Organochlorides show 7 more Substituents Phenylpiperazine / N-arylpiperazine / Aryl 1,2,4-triazol-3-one / Triazolopyridine / Tertiary aliphatic/aromatic amine / Aniline or substituted anilines / Dialkylarylamine / Pyridinone / Chlorobenzene / N-alkylpiperazineHalobenzene / Aryl chloride / Aryl halide / Pyridine / Monocyclic benzene moiety / Benzenoid / 1,2,4-triazole / Azole / Heteroaromatic compound / Triazole / Tertiary aliphatic amine / Tertiary amine / Azacycle / Organooxygen compound / Organonitrogen compound / Organochloride / Organohalogen compound / Hydrocarbon derivative / Organic oxide / Organopnictogen compound / Organic oxygen compound / Organic nitrogen compound / Amine / Aromatic heteropolycyclic compound show 24 more Molecular Framework Aromatic heteropolycyclic compounds External Descriptors N-arylpiperazine, monochlorobenzenes, N-alkylpiperazine, triazolopyridine (CHEBI:9654)

    Targets

    Binding Properties

    ×

    Property Measurement pH Temperature (°C)
    Ki (nM) 44.67 N/A N/A 15322733

    Details Binding Properties1. 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2A Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action Yes Actions Antagonist General Function Virus receptor activity Specific Function G-protein coupled receptor for 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin). Also functions as a receptor for various drugs and psychoactive substances, including mescaline, psilocybin, 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodop… Gene Name HTR2A Uniprot ID P28223 Uniprot Name 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2A Molecular Weight 52602.58 Da ×

    Property Measurement pH Temperature (°C)
    Ki (nM) 223.87 N/A N/A 15322733
    Ki (nM) 25 N/A N/A 7855217

    Details Binding Properties2. 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2C Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action Yes Actions Agonist General Function Serotonin receptor activity Specific Function G-protein coupled receptor for 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin). Also functions as a receptor for various drugs and psychoactive substances, including ergot alkaloid derivatives, 1-2,5,-dimethoxy-4-… Gene Name HTR2C Uniprot ID P28335 Uniprot Name 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2C Molecular Weight 51820.705 Da ×

    Property Measurement pH Temperature (°C)
    Ki (nM) 160 N/A N/A 9537821
    Ki (nM) 252 N/A N/A 9400006
    Ki (nM) 690 N/A N/A 9400006

    Details Binding Properties3. Sodium-dependent serotonin transporter Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action Yes Actions Inhibitor General Function Serotonin:sodium symporter activity Specific Function Serotonin transporter whose primary function in the central nervous system involves the regulation of serotonergic signaling via transport of serotonin molecules from the synaptic cleft back into t… Gene Name SLC6A4 Uniprot ID P31645 Uniprot Name Sodium-dependent serotonin transporter Molecular Weight 70324.165 Da ×

    Property Measurement pH Temperature (°C)
    Ki (nM) 96 N/A N/A 7855217

    Details Binding Properties4. 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1A Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action Yes Actions Antagonist Partial agonist General Function Serotonin receptor activity Specific Function G-protein coupled receptor for 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin). Also functions as a receptor for various drugs and psychoactive substances. Ligand binding causes a conformation change that triggers… Gene Name HTR1A Uniprot ID P08908 Uniprot Name 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1A Molecular Weight 46106.335 Da ×

    Property Measurement pH Temperature (°C)
    Ki (nM) 1100 N/A N/A 7855217

    Details Binding Properties5. Histamine H1 receptor Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action Unknown Actions Antagonist General Function Histamine receptor activity Specific Function In peripheral tissues, the H1 subclass of histamine receptors mediates the contraction of smooth muscles, increase in capillary permeability due to contraction of terminal venules, and catecholamin… Gene Name HRH1 Uniprot ID P35367 Uniprot Name Histamine H1 receptor Molecular Weight 55783.61 Da

    1. Richelson E, Nelson A: Antagonism by antidepressants of neurotransmitter receptors of normal human brain in vitro. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1984 Jul;230(1):94-102.
    2. Noguchi S, Inukai T, Kuno T, Tanaka C: The suppression of olfactory bulbectomy-induced muricide by antidepressants and antihistamines via histamine H1 receptor blocking. Physiol Behav. 1992 Jun;51(6):1123-7.
    3. Justin J. Shin; Abdolreza Saadabadi. (2019). Trazodone, StatPearls. Stat Pearls.

    Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action No Actions Antagonist General Function Protein heterodimerization activity Specific Function This alpha-adrenergic receptor mediates its action by association with G proteins that activate a phosphatidylinositol-calcium second messenger system. Its effect is mediated by G(q) and G(11) prot… Gene Name ADRA1A Uniprot ID P35348 Uniprot Name Alpha-1A adrenergic receptor Molecular Weight 51486.005 Da ×

    Property Measurement pH Temperature (°C)
    Ki (nM) 106 N/A N/A 9400006
    Ki (nM) 320 N/A N/A 7855217

    Details Binding Properties7. Alpha-2A adrenergic receptor Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action No Actions Antagonist General Function Thioesterase binding Specific Function Alpha-2 adrenergic receptors mediate the catecholamine-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase through the action of G proteins. The rank order of potency for agonists of this receptor is oxymetazo… Gene Name ADRA2A Uniprot ID P08913 Uniprot Name Alpha-2A adrenergic receptor Molecular Weight 48956.275 Da Kind Protein Organism Rat Pharmacological action Unknown Actions Antagonist Partial agonist General Function Serotonin receptor activity Specific Function G-protein coupled receptor for 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin). Also functions as a receptor for various drugs and psychoactive substances, including ergot alkaloid derivatives, 1-2,5,-dimethoxy-4-… Gene Name Htr2c Uniprot ID P08909 Uniprot Name 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2C Molecular Weight 51916.005 Da

    Enzymes

    Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action Unknown Actions Substrate General Function Vitamin d3 25-hydroxylase activity Specific Function Cytochromes P450 are a group of heme-thiolate monooxygenases. In liver microsomes, this enzyme is involved in an NADPH-dependent electron transport pathway. It performs a variety of oxidation react… Gene Name CYP3A4 Uniprot ID P08684 Uniprot Name Cytochrome P450 3A4 Molecular Weight 57342.67 Da

    1. Rotzinger S, Fang J, Baker GB: Trazodone is metabolized to m-chlorophenylpiperazine by CYP3A4 from human sources. Drug Metab Dispos. 1998 Jun;26(6):572-5.
    2. Kalgutkar AS, Henne KR, Lame ME, Vaz AD, Collin C, Soglia JR, Zhao SX, Hop CE: Metabolic activation of the nontricyclic antidepressant trazodone to electrophilic quinone-imine and epoxide intermediates in human liver microsomes and recombinant P4503A4. Chem Biol Interact. 2005 Jun 30;155(1-2):10-20. Epub 2005 Apr 18.
    3. Flockhart Table of Drug Interactions
    4. Trazodone

    Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action Unknown Actions Substrate General Function Oxygen binding Specific Function Cytochromes P450 are a group of heme-thiolate monooxygenases. In liver microsomes, this enzyme is involved in an NADPH-dependent electron transport pathway. It oxidizes a variety of structurally un… Gene Name CYP3A5 Uniprot ID P20815 Uniprot Name Cytochrome P450 3A5 Molecular Weight 57108.065 Da

    1. Flockhart Table of Drug Interactions

    Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action Unknown Actions Substrate General Function Oxygen binding Specific Function Cytochromes P450 are a group of heme-thiolate monooxygenases. In liver microsomes, this enzyme is involved in an NADPH-dependent electron transport pathway. It oxidizes a variety of structurally un… Gene Name CYP3A7 Uniprot ID P24462 Uniprot Name Cytochrome P450 3A7 Molecular Weight 57525.03 Da

    1. Flockhart Table of Drug Interactions

    Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action Unknown Actions Substrate Inhibitor General Function Steroid hydroxylase activity Specific Function Responsible for the metabolism of many drugs and environmental chemicals that it oxidizes. It is involved in the metabolism of drugs such as antiarrhythmics, adrenoceptor antagonists, and tricyclic… Gene Name CYP2D6 Uniprot ID P10635 Uniprot Name Cytochrome P450 2D6 Molecular Weight 55768.94 Da

    Transporters

    Kind Protein Organism Humans Pharmacological action Unknown Actions Inducer General Function Xenobiotic-transporting atpase activity Specific Function Energy-dependent efflux pump responsible for decreased drug accumulation in multidrug-resistant cells. Gene Name ABCB1 Uniprot ID P08183 Uniprot Name Multidrug resistance protein 1 Molecular Weight 141477.255 Da ×Unlock Data

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    Drug created on June 13, 2005 07:24 / Updated on February 02, 2020 04:07

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